Etymology
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soundly (adv.)
c. 1400, "safely;" also "deeply" (of sleep), from sound (adj.) + -ly (2). From 1570s as "thoroughly."
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soundless (adj.)
c. 1600 from sound (n.1) + -less. Related: Soundlessly; soundlessness.
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ultrasound (adj.)
1911, from ultra- "beyond" + sound (n.1). Compare ultrasonic. In reference to ultrasonic techniques of detection or diagnosis it is recorded from 1958.
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*swen- 

also swenə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to sound." 

It forms all or part of: assonance; consonant; dissonant; resound; sonant; sonata; sone; sonic; sonnet; sonogram; sonorous; sound (n.1) "noise, what is heard;" sound (v.1) "to be audible;" swan; unison.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit svanati "it sounds," svanah "sound, tone;" Latin sonus "sound, a noise," sonare "to sound;" Old Irish senim "the playing of an instrument;" Old English geswin "music, song," swinsian "to sing;" Old Norse svanr, Old English swan "swan," properly "the sounding bird."

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kindred (n.)

c. 1200, perhaps late Old English, kinraden, "family, lineage; race, nation, tribe, people; kinsfolk, blood relations," compound of kin (q.v.) + -rede (see -red). With unetymological first -d- (17c.) probably for phonetic reasons (compare sound (n.1)) but perhaps encouraged by kind (n.). As an adjective, 1520s, from the noun.

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gesundheit (interj.)

1914, from German Gesundheit, literally "health!", from Old High German gisunt, gisunti "healthy" (see sound (adj.)). Also in the German toast auf ihre Gesundheit "to your health." God bless you after someone sneezes is credited to St. Gregory the Great, but the pagan Romans (Absit omen) and Greeks had similar customs.

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unsound (adj.)
early 14c., of persons, "diseased, wounded," from un- (1) "not" + sound (adj.). Similar formation in Middle Low German unsund, Middle Dutch ongesont, German ungesund. Meaning "morally corrupt" is recorded from c. 1300; that of "not mentally healthy" is from 1540s. Sense of "not based on reasoning or fact" is attested from 1590s. Related: Unsoundly; unsoundness.
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resound (v.)

late 14c., resownen, resounen, of a place, "re-echo, sound back, return an echo; reverberate with," from Anglo-French resuner, Old French resoner "reverberate" (12c., Modern French résonner), from Latin resonare "sound again, resound, echo" (source also of Spanish resonar, Italian risonare), from re- "back, again" (see re-) + sonare "to sound, make a noise" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound").

With unetymological -d- from mid-15c. (compare sound (n.1)). From 1520s of things. Related: Resounded; resounding.

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astound (v.)
mid-15c., from Middle English astouned, astoned (c. 1300), past participle of astonen, astonien "to stun" (see astonish), with more of the original sense of Vulgar Latin *extonare. The unusual form is perhaps because the past participle was so much more common it came to be taken for the infinitive, or/and by the same pattern which produced round (v.) from round (adj.), or by the intrusion of an unetymological -d as in sound (n.1). Related: Astounded; astounding.
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jaundice (n.)
"morbid condition characterized by yellowish skin and eyes (caused by bile pigments in the blood)," c. 1300, jaunis, from Old French jaunice, earlier jalnice, "yellowness" (12c.), from jaune/jalne "yellow," from Latin galbinus "greenish yellow" (also source of Italian giallo), extended form of galbus, which probably is from PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives denoting "green" and "yellow." With unetymological -d- (compare sound (n.1)).

Figurative meaning "feeling in which views are colored or distorted" first recorded 1620s, from yellow's association with bitterness and envy (see yellow (adj.)). In Old English geolu adl "yellow sickness;" in Middle English also gulesought.
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