Etymology
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mercer (n.)

"dealer in small wares or merchandise of any sort," also, specifically, "dealer in textiles or clothes of any sort, especially silk," c. 1200 (late 12c. as a surname), from Old French mercier "shopkeeper, tradesman," from Vulgar Latin *merciarius, from Latin merx "wares, merchandise" (see market (n.)). Related: Mercery.

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Wobbly (n.)

1914, member of Industrial Workers of the World (I.W.W.). Probably some sort of elaboration of the W aspect of the acronym.

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assortment (n.)

1610s, "action of arranging into kinds or classes," from assort + -ment. The sense of "group of things of the same sort" is attested from 1759; that of "group of arranged things whether of the same sort or not" from 1791.

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ideo- 

word-forming element variously used with reference to images or to ideas, from Greek idea "form; the look of a thing; a kind, sort, nature; mode, fashion," in logic, "a class, kind, sort, species" (see idea).

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specific (adj.)

1630s, "having a special quality," from French spécifique and directly from Late Latin specificus "constituting a kind or sort" (in Medieval Latin "specific, particular"), from Latin species "kind, sort" (see species) +  -ficus "making, doing," from combining form of facere "to make." Earlier form was specifical (early 15c.). Meaning "definite, precise" first recorded 1740. Related: Specifically; specificness.

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gat (n.)

"revolver," 1904, slang shortening of Gatling gun; by 1880, gatlin was slang for a gun of any sort.

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Crete 

large island south of Greece, traditionally said to be from Krus, name of a mythological ancestor, but probably an ethnic name of some sort.

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Latinist (n.)

"a student of Latin, an expert in Latin," 1530s, from Latin (n.) + -ist. Also Latiner (1690s), and, for the petty sort, Latinitaster (1836).

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buzkashi (n.)

Afghan sport, a sort of mounted polo played with a goat carcass, 1956, from Persian buz "goat" + kashi "dragging, drawing."

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spode (n.)

fine sort of porcelain, 1869, named for first maker, Josiah Spode (1754-1827), potter in Stoke-on-Trent, England.

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