Etymology
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autochthon (n.)

1640s, "one sprung from the soil he inhabits" (plural autochthones), from Latinized form of Greek autokhthon "aborigines, natives, primitive inhabitants," literally "sprung from the land itself," used of the Athenians and others who claimed descent from the Pelasgians, from autos "self" (see auto-) + khthōn "land, earth, soil" (from PIE root *dhghem- "earth").

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bedaub (v.)
"besmear, soil," 1550s, from be- + daub (v.). Related: Bedaubed; bedaubing.
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chernozem (n.)

"fertile black soil of Ukraine and southern Russia," 1842, from Russian chernozem, literally "black earth," from chernyi "black," from PIE *kers- "dark, dirty" (see Krishna) + zemlya "earth, soil," from Old Russian zemi "land, earth," from PIE root *dhghem- "earth."

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fellah (n.)
"Egyptian peasant," 1743, from Arabic fallah "plowman," from falaha "to plow, till (the soil)."
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husbandman (n.)
c. 1300, "head of a family;" early 14c. as "farmer, tiller of the soil," from husband (n.) + man (n.).
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planting (n.)

late Old English plantung "action of planting, inserting plants in the soil," also "a thing planted," verbal noun from plant (v.).

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humus (n.)
"vegetable mould," 1796, from Latin humus "earth, soil," probably from humi "on the ground," from PIE root *dhghem- "earth." Related: Humous (adj.).
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limy (adj.)
1550s, "resembling or coated with lime," from lime (n.1) + -y (2). Of soil, etc., "containing lime," 1670s. Related: Liminess.
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bespatter (v.)
"soil by splashing with dirty liquid," 1640s, from be- + spatter (v.). Related: Bespattered; bespattering.
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manure (n.)

"dung or compost used as fertilizer, any substance (especially the excrement of livestock) added to the soil to render it more fertile," 1540s, from manure (v.).

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