Etymology
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VFW (n.)

1916, abbreviation of Veterans of Foreign Wars, U.S. organization with roots to 1899.

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PLO 

initialism (acronym) of Palestinian Liberation Organization, by 1965.

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psychosocial (adj.)

also psycho-social, "pertaining to or involving the influence of social factors on a person's mind or behavior," 1891, from psycho- + social (adj.).

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organisation (n.)

chiefly British English spelling of organization. For spelling, see -ize. Related: Organisational.

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asocial (adj.)

1883, "antagonistic to society or social order," from a- (3) "not" + social (adj.); also compare antisocial.

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Warfarin (n.)

1950, from WARF, acronym from Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation + -arin, from Coumarin. The organization describes itself as "an independent, nonprofit foundation chartered to support research at the U[niversity of] W[isconsin]-Madison and the designated technology transfer organization for the university."

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antisocial (adj.)

also anti-social, "unsocial, averse to social intercourse," 1797, from anti- + social (adj.). The meaning "hostile to social order or norms" is from 1802. Other, older words in the "disinclined to or unsuited for society" sense include dissocial (1762), dissociable (c. 1600).

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Komsomol (n.)

Russian communist youth organization, 1925, from Russian Komsomol, contraction of Kommunisticheskii Soyuz Molodezhi "Communist Union of Youth."

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A.A.A. 

also AAA, abbreviation of American Automobile Association, attested 1902, American English, the year the organization was founded.

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clan (n.)

"a family, a tribe," especially, among the Highlanders of Scotland, a form of social organization consisting of a tribe holding land in common under leadership of a chieftain, early 15c., from Gaelic clann "family, stock, offspring," akin to Old Irish cland "offspring, tribe," both from Latin planta "offshoot" (see plant (n.)).

The Goidelic branch of Celtic (including Gaelic) had no initial p-, so it substituted k- or c- for Latin p-. The same Latin word in (non-Goidelic) Middle Welsh became plant "children."

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