Etymology
Advertisement
snapdragon (n.)
garden plant, 1570s, from snap (n.) + dragon. So called from fancied resemblance of antirrhinum flowers to a dragon's mouth. As the name of a Christmas game of plucking raisins from burning brandy and eating them alight, from 1704.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
knapsack (n.)
c. 1600, from Low German Knapsack (16c.), probably from knappen "to eat" literally "to crack, snap" (imitative) + Sack "bag" (see sack (n.1)). Similar formation in Dutch knapzak.
Related entries & more 
snappy (adj.)
"quick, energetic," 1825, from snap (v.) + -y (2). Meaning "clever, smart" is from 1871; that of "neat and stylishly elegant" is from 1881. Related: Snappily; snappiness. Command make it snappy attested from 1910.
Related entries & more 
snip (n.)
1550s, "small piece of cut-out cloth," probably from Dutch or Low German snippen "to snip, shred," of imitative origin. Meaning "cut made by scissors" is from 1590s. As a nickname or cant word for a tailor, 1590s. Snip-snap-snorum, the card game, is 1755, from Low German.
Related entries & more 
clevis (n.)

"U-shaped iron bar with holes at the ends for a bolt or pin, used as a fastener," 1590s, of unknown origin; perhaps from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse klofi "a cleft," from Proto-Germanic *klub‑ "a splitting," from PIE root *gleubh- "to tear apart, cleave." Also uncertain is whether it is originally a plural or a singular.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
snapper (n.)
"one who or that which snaps," 1570s, agent noun from snap (v.). Applied to various fishes since 1690s. Slang meaning "vagina" is by 2000. As a short form of snapping turtle (1784) it is recorded from 1872. Snappers "teeth" is attested from 1924.
Related entries & more 
flip (n.1)
1690s, "a flick, a snap;" see flip (v.). In reference to an overturning of the body, probably short for flip-flap (see flip-flop) "somersault in which the performer throws himself over on hands and feet alternately," 1670s, originally a move in (male) dancing.
Related entries & more 
lickety-split (adj.)
1852, American English; earlier lickety-cut, lickety-click, and simply licketie (1817), probably a fanciful extension of lick (n.1) in its dialectal sense of "very fast sprint in a race" (1809) on the notion of a flick of the tongue as a fast thing (compare blink, snap).
Related entries & more 
snoop (v.)
1832, "to go around in a prying manner," American English, probably from Dutch snoepen "to pry," also "eat in secret, eat sweets, sneak," probably related to snappen "to bite, snatch" (see snap (v.)). Specific meaning "to pry into other people's business" is attested from 1921. Related: Snooped; snooping.
Related entries & more 

Page 2