Etymology
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pink-eye (n.)

contagious eye infection, 1882, American English, from pink (adj.) + eye (n.). Earlier it meant "a small eye" (1570s).

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eye-drop (n.)
also eyedrop, 1590s, "tear," from eye (n.) + drop (n.). From 1938 as "a drop for the eye." Related: Eye-dropper.
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eye-tooth (n.)
also eyetooth, "upper canine tooth," 1570s, so called for its position immediately under or next to the eye. Compare German Augenzahn. Related: Eye-teeth.
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black eye (n.)

"discoloration around the eye from injury" c. 1600, from black (adj.) + eye (n.). Figurative sense of "injury to pride, rebuff" is by 1744; that of "bad reputation" is from 1880s.

In reference to dark eyes, often as a mark of beauty, from 1660s. Black-eyed is from 1590s of women, of peas from 1728. The black-eyed Susan as a flower (various species) so called from 1881, for its appearance. It also was the title of a poem by John Gay (1685-1732), which led to a popular mid-19c. British stage play of the same name.

All in the Downs the fleet was moored,
  The streamers waving in the wind,
When black-eyed Susan came aboard,
  "Oh! where shall I my true love find?
Tell me, ye jovial sailors, tell me true,
If my sweet William sails among the crew?"
[etc.]
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stink eye (n.)
"dirty look," by 1972, perhaps from Hawaiian slang.
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eye-piece (n.)

also eyepiece, "the lens or combination of lenses to which the eye is applied in an optical instrument," 1738, from eye (n.) + piece (n.1).

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eye-shade (n.)

also eyeshade, "a shade for the eyes," 1808 as a type of headgear, from eye (n.) + shade (n.).

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red-eye (n.)

"airplane flight which deprives travelers of sleep," 1968, from the red eyes of sleeplessness; earlier it was a noun meaning "raw and inferior whiskey" (1819, American English); it also has been used of various fish.

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bulls-eye (n.)
also bullseye, 1833 as "center of a target," from bull (n.1) + eye (n.). So called for size and color. Meaning "shot that hits the mark" is from 1857. Bulls-eye also was used from 1680s of various sorts of circular holes or objects with them.
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eye-witness (n.)

also eyewitness, "one who testifies to something he has seen," 1530s, from eye (n.) + witness (n.). As a verb from 1844. Related: Eyewitnessed; eyewitnessing.

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