Etymology
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gat (n.)

"revolver," 1904, slang shortening of Gatling gun; by 1880, gatlin was slang for a gun of any sort.

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doofus (n.)
student slang, "dolt, idiot, nerd," by 1960s. "Dictionary of American Slang" says "probably related to doo-doo and goofus."
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enforcer (n.)
1570s, "one who compels, constrains, or urges," agent noun from enforce. Underworld slang meaning "violent intimidator" is from 1934, U.S. underworld slang.
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bonkers (adj.)
"crazy," 1957, British slang, perhaps from earlier naval slang meaning "slightly drunk" (1948), from notion of a thump ("bonk") on the head.
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chav (n.)
"antisocial youth," British slang, by 2004, apparently from earlier charver "loutish young person wearing designer-style sportswear," Northern British slang (1997) of uncertain origin. Earlier it was a verb in homosexual slang for "have sex." Perhaps ultimately from Romany (Gypsy).
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skivvies (n.)

"underwear," by 1932, nautical slang, of unknown origin. An earlier skivvy/skivey was London slang for "female domestic servant" (1902).

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tosser (n.)
term of contempt in British slang, by 1977, probably from slang toss off "act of masturbation" (1735). Agent noun from toss (v.). Compare jerk (n.).
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nertz (interj.)

also nerts, 1932, originally American English college slang, colloquial or euphemistic pronunciation of nuts as a slang retort of defiance or dismissal (1931).

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puss (n.2)

"the face" (but sometimes, especially in pugilism slang, "the mouth"), especially when sour-looking or ugly, 1890, slang, from Irish pus "lip, mouth."

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