Etymology
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side-saddle (n.)
"saddle made for the occupant to ride on with both feet on the same side of the horse," used chiefly by women, late 15c., from side (adj.) + saddle (n.).
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side-way (n.)
also sideway, 1550s, lateral space for passage or movement," from side (n.) + way (n.).
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effectual (adj.)
"producing an effect; having power to produce an effect," late 14c., Old French effectuel, from Late Latin effectualis, from Latin effectus "accomplishment, performance" (see effect (n.)). Used properly of actions (not agents) and with a sense "having the effect aimed at" (effective, by contrast, is used of the agent or the thing done and with a sense "having great effect"). Related: Effectually; effectualness.
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paralipsis (n.)

"pretended or suggested omission for rhetorical effect," 1580s, from Greek paraleipsis "passing by omission," from paraleipein "to leave on one side, pass over, leave untold," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + leipein "to leave" (from PIE root *leikw- "to leave"). As in passages that open with "not to mention," "to say nothing of," etc.

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concurrent (adj.)

late 14c., "acting in conjunction, contributing to the same effect or event," from Old French concurrent or directly from Latin concurrentem (nominative concurrens), present participle of concurrere "to run together, assemble hurriedly; clash, fight," in transferred use, "to happen at the same time" (see concur). Related: Concurrency; concurrently.

Meaning "running together side by side" is from late 15c. Meaning "combined, joint" is from 1530s. In law, concurrent jurisdiction (that possessed equally by two courts and if exercised by one not usually assumed by the other) is recorded from 1767.

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effective (adj.)
late 14c., "serving to effect the intended purpose," from Old French effectif, from Latin effectivus "productive, effective," from effect-, stem of efficere "work out, accomplish" (see effect (n.)). Of military forces, "fit for action or duty," from 1680s.
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pixilation (n.)

"creation of the effect of animation in live actors," 1947, from pixilated. For the computer image effect, see pixelation.

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sidekick (n.)
also side-kick, "companion or close associate," 1901, also side-kicker (1903), American English, of unknown origin. Earlier terms were side-pal (1886), side-partner (1886).
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sidearm (adj.)
also side-arm, 1908, from side (adj.) + arm (n.1).
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