Etymology
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sitz-bath (n.)

"hip-bath," also a tub adapted for such a bath, 1849, a hybrid from German Sitzbad, literally "bath in a sitting position," from German sitzen (see sit (v.)) with English bath for cognate German Bad.

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short-timer (n.)

in the military sense of "one whose term or enlistment is about to expire," 1906, from short (adj.) + time (n.) + agent noun ending -er (1). Earlier "child who attends school part-time" (by 1863); "prostitute's customer" (1923). The noun phrase short time is attested by mid-14c.

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short-change (v.)

also shortchange, "to cheat by giving too little change to," by 1893, American English (implied in short-changed), from adjectival expression short-change (with man, worker, operator, trick, racket, etc.), by 1886, from short (adj.) + change (n.) in the money sense. In late 19c. they were among the shady hangers on of traveling circuses. The noun phrase short change for "insufficient change" is attested by 1850. Related: Short-changing.

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one-stop (adj.)

1914, of airplane flights, "making a single stop along the way," from one + stop (n.). Of commercial establishments, "able to supply all of a customer's needs," by 1931. 

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non-stop (adj.)

also nonstop, "that does not stop," 1903, from non- + stop (n.); originally of railway trains not making intermediate stops. As an adverb by 1920.

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short-wave (adj.)

in reference to radio wavelength less than c.100 meters, by 1907, from the noun phrase short wave, attested by 1839 in electromagnetics; see  short (adj.) + wave (n.).

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stop-and-go (adj.)

1926, originally a reference to traffic signals; see stop (v.), go (v.). Stop-go in same sense is from 1918.

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door-stop (n.)

"device placed behind a door to prevent it from being opened too widely," 1859, from door + stop (n.).

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bird-bath (n.)

also birdbath, "small basin filled with water, placed in a garden, etc. for wild birds to drink from and bathe in," 1862, from bird (n.1) + bath (n.).

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cat-bath (n.)

"hurried or partial cleaning," 1935, from cat (n.) + bath (n.). Cat-lick in this sense is from 1892; Middle English had cat-likked "licked clean." 

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