Etymology
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short-change (v.)
also shortchange, "to cheat by giving too little change to," 1903, from adjectival expression short-change (with man, trick, etc.), 1901, from short (adj.) + change (n.).
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short-order (adj.)
of restaurants, from 1897, from adverbial expression in short order "rapidly, with no fuss," from short (adj.) + order (n.).
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short circuit (n.)
also short-circuit, 1854, in electricity, from short (adj.) + circuit (n.). As a verb, introduce a shunt of low resistance," from 1867; intransitive sense from 1902; in the figurative sense is recorded by 1899. Related: short-circuited; short-circuiting.
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shortage (n.)
1862, American English, from short + -age.
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shorty (n.)
"short person," 1888, from short (adj.) + -y (3).
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shortfall (n.)
also short-fall, 1895; see short (adj.) + fall (v.).
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shorthand (n.)
method of rapid writing, 1636, from short (adj.) in the "rapid" sense + hand (n.) "handwriting."
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shorts (n.)
"short pants," 1826, from short (adj.). Short-shorts is attested from 1946, originally men's briefs.
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shortcoming (n.)
1670s, from the phrase to come short "be inadequate" (1570s); see short (adj.). Related: Shortcomings.
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shortly (adv.)
Old English scortlice "briefly," also, in late Old English, "in short time;" from short (adj.) + -ly (2).
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