Etymology
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workshop (n.)

1580s, from work (n.) + shop (n.). Meaning "gathering for study, etc.," is from 1937.

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pawnshop (n.)

also pawn-shop, "pawnbroker's establishment," by 1763, from pawn (n.1) + shop (n.).

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shopper (n.)

1860, "one who visits shops for the purpose of examining and buying goods," agent noun from shop (v.). As a newspaper devoted to advertising, by 1958.

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shoplifter (n.)

"one who purloins goods from a shop while posing as a customer," 1670s, from shop (n.) + agent noun of lift (v.). Also as nouns in the same sense were shop-lift (1670s); shop-thief.

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sweatshop (n.)

also sweat-shop, 1892, from sweat (v.) + shop (n.). The verb sweat is attested from 1879 in the sense "employ (someone) in hard work for low wages," and compare sweater "one who exacts wages at very low prices" (1846).

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head shop (n.)

emporium for stoner gear, by 1969 (noted in 1966 as the name of a specific shop in New York City selling psychedelic stuff), from head (n.) in the drug sense.

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junk-shop (n.)

1800, "marine shop," from junk (n.1) in the sense "discarded articles from ships." By 1951 in the non-marine sense "junk-dealer."

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shopkeeper (n.)

1520s, "one who keeps a shop for the sale of goods; a retail trader," as distinct from a merchant or wholesaler; from shop (n.) + keeper. The verbal phrase keep shop is attested from 15c. Caxton (late 15c.) uses shop-holder. The phrase nation of shopkeepers is in Adam Smith (1776), but rose to public attention c. 1803 as Napoleon's supposed disparaging and dismissive judgment on his neighbors to the north, who embraced the label. Related: Shop-keeping.

Bonaparte formerly called the English a nation of Shop-keepers; he mush acknowledge that we have COUNTER-acted all his projects. [Chester, Cheshire, and North Wales Advertiser, Dec. 19, 1817]
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shoppe (n.)

a common Middle English form or spelling of shop (n.) used in Chaucer, etc. Noted by 1918 as an antiquarian affectation in U.S. commercial establishments.

YE EAT SHOPPE
I admit that the name is against it. As a matter of fact, 732 Eighth Avenue is nothing more nor less than a good old-fashioned midnight lunch-room camouflaged by a flossy title. [Helen Worden Erskine, "The Real New York," 1933]

Other Middle English variant spellings, left in commercial obscurity, include shope, schop, schope, chop, choppe, shep, ssoppe, scop-, shup-.

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shopping (n.)

1764, "the act or practice of visiting shops for the purpose of examining and purchasing goods," a verbal noun from shop (v.). The meaning "goods that have been purchased" is attested by 1934.

Shopping bag is attested from 1864; shopping cart by 1929. Shopping list, of purchases to be made or stores to be visited, is by 1874; transferred and figurative use is by 1959. The modern shopping center is attested by 1933. Shopping day "day in which stores are open" is by 1859; specifically in advertisements announcing the time remaining to purchase Christmas gifts, by 1881.

Twenty-One Days Only and Christmas will be here. Deduct Three (Sundays) leaves Eighteen Shopping Days. Again deduct Six Days (the last) monopolized by the Grand Army of Put-Offs, leaves but 12 DAYS in which Common-Sense Customers may buy their Holiday Gifts in Comfort, Convenience and Pleasure. [from an advertisement for Rosenbaum's store, Philadelphia Times, Dec. 4, 1881]
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