Etymology
Advertisement
No results were found for shitting. Showing results for sitting.
bed-rest (n.)
by 1836 as "device for sitting up in bed;" by 1896 as "a resting in bed for recovery from injury or illness;" from bed (n.) + rest (n.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Upanishad (n.)
one of a class of speculative treatises in Sanskrit literature, 1805, from Sanskrit upa-nishad, literally "a sitting down beside." From upa "near to" (from PIE root *upo "under," also "up from under," hence also "over") + ni-shad "to sit or lie down," from ni "downward" (from PIE *ni-, see nether) + -sad "sitting," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit."
Related entries & more 
lunch-counter (n.)

"long, elevated table where customers eat standing or sitting on high stools," 1854, American English; see lunch (n.) + counter (n.).

Related entries & more 
seat (n.1)
"thing to sit on; act of sitting," c. 1200, from Old Norse sæti "seat, position," from Proto-Germanic *sæt- (source also of Old High German saze, Middle Dutch gesaete "seat," Old High German gisazi, German Gesäß "buttocks"), from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." Meaning "posterior of the body" (the sitting part) is from c. 1600; sense of "part of a garment which covers the buttocks" is from 1835. Seat belt is from 1915, originally in airplanes.
Related entries & more 
sederunt (n.)
"sitting, session," Latin, literally "they sat" (typical opening word in recordings of such proceedings), third person plural past tense of sedere "to sit," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
living room (n.)
"room set up for ordinary family or social use, sitting-room," 1795 (as opposed to bedroom, dining room, etc.); from living (n.) + room (n.).
Related entries & more 
sitzkrieg (n.)
1940, "static warfare" (such as prevailed in Europe in the winter of 1939-40), R.A.F. coinage on analogy of blitzkrieg (q.v.), from German sitz "a sitting," from sitzen "to sit" (see sit (v.)).
Related entries & more 
stroma (n.)
1835 in anatomy, plural stromae, Modern Latin, from Latin stroma "bed covering," from Greek stroma "coverlet, covering, mattress, anything spread out for lying or sitting on," from PIE root *stere- "to spread."
Related entries & more 
Eisteddfod (n.)
"annual assembly of Welsh bards," 1822, from Welsh eisteddfod "congress of bards or literati," literally "a session, a sitting," from eistedd "to sit" (from sedd "seat," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit") + bod "to be" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow"). The Welsh plural is eisteddfodau.
Related entries & more 
incubation (n.)
1610s, "a brooding," from Latin incubationem (nominative incubatio) "a laying upon eggs," noun of action from past participle stem of incubare "to hatch," literally "to lie on, rest on," from in- "on" (from PIE root *en "in") + cubare "to lie" (see cubicle). The literal sense of "sitting on eggs to hatch them" in English is first recorded 1640s.
Related entries & more 

Page 2