Etymology
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ewe (n.)

Old English eowu "female sheep," fem. of eow "sheep," from Proto-Germanic *awi, genitive *awjoz (source also of Old Saxon ewi, Old Frisian ei, Middle Dutch ooge, Dutch ooi, Old High German ouwi "sheep," Gothic aweþi "flock of sheep"), from PIE *owi- "sheep" (source also of Sanskrit avih, Greek ois, Latin ovis, Lithuanian avis "sheep," Old Church Slavonic ovica "ewe," Old Irish oi "sheep," Welsh ewig "hind").

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baa 

imitative of the cry or bleat of a sheep, attested from 1580s as a noun and verb, but probably older, as baa is recorded before this as a name for a child's toy sheep. Compare Latin bee "sound made by a sheep" (Varro), balare "to bleat;" Greek blēkhē "a bleating;" Catalan be "a sheep." Related: Baaed; baaing.

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Faroese (n.)

also Faeroese, 1816, from the Faroe islands, at the ends of the North Sea, literally "sheep-islands," from Faroese Føroyar, from før "sheep" + oy (plural oyar) "island."

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ovivorous (adj.)

1812, "egg-eating;" 1865, "sheep-eating;" see ovi- + -vorous.

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ovi- 

word-forming element meaning either "of or pertaining to an egg or eggs," from Latin ōvum "egg" (see ovum), or "of or pertaining to sheep," from Latin ovis "sheep" (see ewe).

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bighorn (n.)

"Rocky Mountain sheep," 1805, American English (Lewis & Clark), from big + horn (n.).

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bleat (n.)

"the cry of a sheep, goat, or calf," c. 1500, from bleat (v.).

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teg (n.)

sheep in its second year, 1520s, of uncertain origin, perhaps from a Scandinavian source (compare Swedish tacka "ewe").

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fold (n.1)

"pen or enclosure for sheep or other domestic animals," Old English falæd, falud "stall, stable, cattle-pen," a general Germanic word (cognates: East Frisian folt "enclosure, dunghill," Dutch vaalt "dunghill," Danish fold "pen for sheep"), of uncertain origin. Figurative use by mid-14c.

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shorn (adj.)

"shaven," late Old English scoren, strong past-participle adjective from shear (v.). Originally of clerics; by 1510s of sheep.

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