Etymology
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ague (n.)
c. 1300, "acute fever," also (late 14c.) "malarial fever (involving episodes of chills and shivering)" from Old French ague "acute fever," from Medieval Latin (febris) acuta "sharp (fever)," from fem. of acutus "sharp" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce").
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sharper (n.)

1560s, "one who sharpens or makes sharp," agent noun from obsolete verb sharp "to make sharp" (see sharp (adj.)). The meaning "swindler, one shrewd in making bargains" is from 1680s, probably a variant of sharker (see shark (n.)). The shortened form sharpie in this sense is by 1942 (also sharpster), at that time also probably involving the "sharply dressed" sense of the adjective.

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acetic (adj.)

1808 (in acetic acid), from French acétique "pertaining to vinegar, sour, having the properties of vinegar," from Latin acetum "vinegar" (properly vinum acetum "wine turned sour;" see vinegar), originally the past participle of acere "be sharp; be sour" (related to acer "sharp," from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce").

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trenchant (adj.)
early 14c., "cutting, sharp," from Old French trenchant "cutting, sharp" (literal and figurative), present participle of trenchier "to cut" (see trench). Figurative sense in English is from c. 1600.
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sharpness (n.)

"state or character of being sharp; keenness of edge or point; intellectual shrewdness," Old English scearpnis; see sharp (adj.) + -ness. "Ancrene Riwle" (c. 1200) has scharp schipe ("sharpship").

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acrimony (n.)

1540s, "quality of being sharp or pungent in taste," from French acrimonie or directly from Latin acrimonia "sharpness, pungency of taste," figuratively "acrimony, severity, energy," abstract noun from acer "sharp" (fem. acris), from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce") + -monia suffix of action, state, condition (see -mony). Figurative extension to personal sharpness or bitterness is by 1610s.

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acescent (adj.)

"becoming sour," 1670s, from French acescent, from Latin acescentem (nominative acescens), present participle of acescere "become sour," from acer "sharp" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce").

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smack (n.2)
"smart, sharp sound made by the lips," 1560s, from smack (v.1). Meaning "a loud kiss" is recorded from c. 1600. Meaning "sharp sound made by hitting something with the flat of the hand" is from c. 1746.
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acervulus (n.)

"brain-sand" (anatomical), 1806, medical Latin, literally "little heap," diminutive of Latin acervus "heap," which is akin to acer "sharp" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point"). Compare acervate.

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scarp (n.)

1580s, of fortifications, "interior slope of a ditch," hence any sharp, steep slope, from Italian scarpa "slope," which is probably from a Germanic source, perhaps Gothic skarpo "pointed object," from Proto-Germanic *skarpa- "cutting, sharp," source also of Middle High German schroffe "sharp rock, crag," Old English scræf "cave, grave" (from PIE root *sker- (1) "to cut"). Compare escarpment.

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