Etymology
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reproach (v.)

mid-14c., reprochen, "charge with a fault, censure severely," from Anglo-French repruchier, Old French reprochier "upbraid, blame, accuse, speak ill of," from reproche "blame, shame, disgrace" (see reproach (n.)). The sense of "rebuke, revile, abuse" is from 1510s. Related: Reproached; reproaching; reproachable.

To reproach a person is to lay blame upon him in direct address, and with feeling, to endeavor to shame him with what he has done. [Century Dictionary]
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disgrace (n.)
Origin and meaning of disgrace

1580s, "state of being out of favor of one in a powerful or exalted position;" also "cause of shame or reproach;" 1590s, "state of ignominy, dishonor, or shame," from French disgrace (16c.), from Italian disgrazia, from dis- (see dis-) + grazia, from Latin gratia "favor, esteem, regard; pleasing quality, good will, gratitude" (see grace (n.)).

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disgraceful (adj.)

1590s, "graceless," from dis- + graceful; also "full of disgrace, shameful, dishonorable, bringing or deserving shame" (1590s), from disgrace (n.) + -ful. Related: Disgracefully; disgracefulness.

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brutality (n.)
1540s, "quality of resembling a brute;" 1630s, "savage cruelty, inhuman behavior, insensibility to pity or shame," from brutal + -ity. Literal sense "condition or state of a brute" is from 1711.
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reproof (n.)

mid-14c., "a shame, a disgrace" (a sense now obsolete), also "a censure to one's face, a rebuke addressed to a person," from Old French reprove "reproach, rejection," verbal noun from reprover "to blame, accuse" (see reprove).

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redden (v.)

1610s, "make read;" 1640s, "become red" (especially of the face, with shame, etc.), from red (adj.1) + -en (1). The older verb form is Middle English reden, Old English readian, reodian "become red;" see red (v.). Related: Reddened; reddening.

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rebuke (n.)

early 15c., "a reproof for fault or wrong, a direct reprimand," also "an insult, a rebuff," nd in the now archaic sense of "a shame, disgrace," from rebuke (v.). From mid-15c. as "a setback, a defeat."

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confusion (n.)

c. 1300, confusioun, "overthrow, ruin," from Old French confusion "disorder, confusion, shame" (11c.) and directly from Latin confusionem (nominative confusio) "a mingling, mixing, blending; confusion, disorder," noun of action from past-participle stem of confundere "to pour together," also "to confuse" (see confound).

Meaning "act of mingling together two or more things or notions properly separate" is from mid-14c. Sense of "a putting to shame, perturbation of the mind" (a sort of mental "overthrow") is from c. 1400 in English, while that of "mental perplexity, state of having indistinct ideas" is from 1590s. Meaning "state of being mixed together," literally or figuratively, "a disorderly mingling" is from late 14c.

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brazen (adj.)
Old English bræsen "of brass," from bræs "brass" (see brass (n.)) + -en (2). The figurative sense of "hardened in effrontery" is from 1570s (in brazen-faced), perhaps suggesting a face unable to show shame. To brazen it "face impudently" is from 1550s. Related: Brazenly.
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alack (interj.)
expression of sorrow or dismay, mid-15c. contraction of ah, lack, which according to Skeat is from lack (n.) in its secondary Middle English sense of "loss, failure, fault, reproach, shame." According to OED, originally an expression of dissatisfaction, later of regret or unpleasant surprise. Sometimes extended as alackaday ("alack the day").
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