Etymology
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psychosexual (adj.)

also psycho-sexual, "involving the mental and emotional aspects of sexuality," 1891, from psycho- + sexual. Related: Psychosexually.

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sexualize (v.)

also sexualise, 1839, "confer a sexual distinction upon" (a thing, idea, etc.), from sexual + -ize. Related: Sexualized; sexualizing.

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dog-tag (n.)

"soldier's identity disk," 1918, U.S. slang, from dog (n.) + tag (n.1). So called perhaps from resemblance to the identification/license tag on dog collars.

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anaphrodisiac (adj.)

"diminishing the sexual appetite," 1823, from Greek anaphroditos "without sexual desire," or from an- (1) "not, without" + aphrodisiac. Related: Anaphrodisia; anaphroditic; anaphroditous.

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occultation (n.)

early 15c., occultacioun, "disguise or concealment of identity," from Latin occultationem (nominative occultatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of occultare "to hide, conceal," frequentative of occulere "to cover over, conceal" (see occult).

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aphrodisiac (n.)

"preparation or drug which excites sexual desire," 1719, from Latinized form of Greek aphrodisiakos "inducing sexual desire," from Aphrodisios, "sacred to Aphrodite, pertaining to Aphrodite," Greek goddess of love and beauty (see Aphrodite), whose name also meant "sexual pleasure; a temple of Aphrodite." As an adjective from 1775 (earlier was aphrodisical, 1719). Aphrodisian "devoted to sexual love" is attested from 1864.

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bit (n.2)

computerese word, 1948, coined by U.S. computer pioneer John W. Tukey, an abbreviation of binary digit, probably chosen for its identity with bit (n.1).

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perv (n.)

also perve, "a sexual pervert," 1944, slang shortening of (sexual) pervert (n.). As a slang verb, by 1941 as "to act erotically" (intransitive), by 1959 as "to eroticize" something (transitive).

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asexual (adj.)

1829, as a term in biology, "having no sex or sexual system," a hybrid from a- (3) "not" + sexual. In general contexts, "wanting sexuality, being of or referring to neither sex," attested from 1896.

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