Etymology
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novena (n.)

in Catholicism, "devotions consisting of special prayers or services on nine successive days," 1745, from Medieval Latin novena, fem. of Latin novenus "ninefold," from novem "nine" (see nine). 

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bitching (adj.)

also bitchen, "good," teen/surfer slang attested from 1950s, apparently from bitch (v.) in some inverted sense. The noun meaning "complaining" is attested by 1945, U.S. armed services.

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bribery (n.)

late 14c., "theft, robbery, swindling, pilfering," from Old French briberie; see bribe (n.) + -ery. The specific sense of "act of magistrates taking money for corrupted services" is from 1540s; the sense of "offering of a bribe" is from 1560s.

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diversification (n.)

"act of changing forms or qualities," c. 1600, noun of action from Medieval Latin diversificare "to diversify" (see diversify). Economic sense, in reference to the spread of production over a variety of services or articles, is attested from 1939, later of the spread of investments over a variety of enterprises.

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bellhop (n.)

also bell-hop, "attendant in a hotel who carries guests' luggage and performs other services," by 1906, American English, shortening of slang bellhopper (1899), from bell (n.) + hop (v.). The notion is one who "hops" into action when the bell is rung.

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officiate (v.)

"to perform the duty of a priest," 1630s, from Medieval Latin officiatus, present participle of officiare "perform religious services," from Latin officium "a service" (in Medieval Latin, "church service"); see office. The earlier verb in English was simply office (mid-15c.). Related: Officiated; officiating.

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voucher (n.)

1520s, originally "summoning of a person into court to warrant the title to a property, a calling to vouch;" see vouch. Meaning "receipt from a business transaction" is first attested 1690s; sense of "document which can be exchanged for goods or services" is attested from 1947.

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hire (n.)

"payment for work, use, or services; wages," from late Old English hyr "wages; interest, usury," from the verb or from a Proto-Germanic *hurja- (see hire (v.)). Cognate with Old Frisian here, Dutch huur, German heuer, Danish hyre.

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mutable (adj.)

late 14c., "liable to change," from Latin mutabilis "changeable," from mutare "to change," from PIE root *mei- (1) "to change, go, move," with derivatives referring to the exchange of goods and services as regulated by custom or law (compare Latin mutuus "done in exchange").

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gratuity (n.)

1520s, "graciousness," from French gratuité (14c.) or directly from Medieval Latin gratuitatem (nominative gratuitas) "free gift," probably from Latin gratuitus "done without pay, spontaneous, voluntary," from gratus "pleasing, agreeable," from gratia "favor" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor"). Meaning "money given for favor or services" is first attested 1530s.

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