Etymology
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oligopoly (n.)

"a state of limited competition in which a market is shared by a few producers or sellers," 1887, from Medieval Latin oligopolium, from Greek oligos "little, small," in plural, "the few" (a word of uncertain origin) + pōlein "to sell" (from PIE root *pel- (4) "to sell."). Related: Oligopolist.

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pardoner (n.)

"man licensed to sell papal pardons or indulgences," late 14c. (early 14c. as a surname), agent noun from pardon (v.).

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catchpenny (n.)

"something of little value but externally attractive and made to sell quickly," 1760, from catch (v.) + penny (n.). Also as an adjective.

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overbook (v.)

"to sell more tickets than there are seats," by 1861, from over- + book (v.); originally in reference to coaches. Related: Overbooked; overbooking.

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man-stealer (n.)

also manstealer, "one who kidnaps human beings to sell into slavery," 1580s, from man (n. ) + agent noun from steal (v.).

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vendue (n.)
"public sale, auction," 1680s, from Dutch vendu, from obsolete French vendue "sale, selling price," from vendre "to sell," from Latin vendere (see vend).
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auction (v.)

"sell by auction," by 1723 (implied in auctioned), from auction (n.). Since early 19c., commonly with off (adv.). Related: Auctioning.

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*pel- (4)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to sell." 

It forms all or part of: bibliopole; monopolize; monopoly; oligopolistic; oligopoly.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit panate "barters, purchases;" Lithuanian pelnas "gain;" Greek pōlein "to sell;" Old Church Slavonic splenu, Russian polon "prey, booty;" Old Norse falr, Dutch veil, German feil "for sale, venal."  

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copyright (n.)

"the exclusive right to make and sell copies of an intellectual production," 1729, from copy (v.) + right (n.). As a verb, "to secure a copyright of," from 1806 (implied in past-participle adjective copyrighted).

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vendor (n.)
1590s, from late Anglo-French vendor, from vendre "to vend," from Latin vendere "to sell" (see vend). More common in legal use than vender.
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