Etymology
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do-it-yourself (adj.)

as a modifier, attested by 1941. The expression is much older (1610s). Related: Do-it-yourselfer.

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albeit (conj.)

late 14c., a contraction of al be it "al(though) it be (that);" see all be it. Chaucer also uses a past-tense form, al were it.

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jus 

a word that has entered English in expressions from Latin, where it means "law, right" (see jurist) and French, where it means "juice" (see juice (n.)).

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Amerindian (adj.)

1900; see Amerind, of which it is the derived adjective.

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opisthography (n.)

"the practice of writing on the back of anything," 1715, from Greek opisthographos "written on the back," from graphos "writing" (from graphein"to write" (see -graphy) + opisthen "behind, from behind, at the back," from opi, a variant of epi "on it, at it" (see epi-). 

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Algol 

variable star (Beta Persei) in the constellation Perseus, late 14c., literally "the Demon," from Arabic al-ghul "the demon" (see ghoul). It corresponds, in modern representations of the constellation, to the gorgon's head Perseus holds, but probably it was so called because it visibly varies in brightness every three days, which sets it apart from other bright stars.

The computer language (1959) is a contraction of algo(rithmic) l(anguage); see algorithm.

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nevermind (n.)

also never-mind "difference, matter for attention," 1935, American English, from verbal expression never mind "forget it, pay no attention to it," originally never mind it attested by 1795; see never + mind (v.).

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cow-pox (n.)

also cowpox, disease of cattle, 1780, see cow (n.) + pox. The fluid of the vesicles can communicate it to humans, and getting it provides almost complete immunity to smallpox.

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shamefast 

"bashful, modest," see shamefaced, which is a corruption of it. Related: Shamefastly; shamefastness.

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cheese (v.)

"stop (what one is doing), run off," 1812, thieves' slang, of uncertain origin. The meaning "to smile" is from 1930 (see cheese (n.1)). For the sense of "annoy," see cheesed.

CHEESE IT. Be silent, be quiet, don't do it. Cheese it, the coves are fly; be silent, the people understand our discourse. ["Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit, and Pickpocket Eloquence," London, 1811]
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