Etymology
Advertisement
gaze (n.)
1540s, "thing stared at;" 1560s as "long look," from gaze (v.). Gaze-hound (1560s) was an old name for a dog that follows prey by sight, not scent.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
fumigate (v.)
1520s, "scent with perfumes," back-formation from fumigation. The older verb was simply fume (c. 1400). Meaning "apply smoke or fumes to," especially for cleansing purposes, is from 1781. Related: Fumigated; fumigating; fumigatory.
Related entries & more 
rosewood (n.)

1650s, "close-grained wood of various Brazilian trees," from rose (n.1) + wood (n.). The name is due to the scent of some species when freshly cut. Later applied to similar woods from other sources.

Related entries & more 
redolent (adj.)

c. 1400, of flowers, food, etc., "having or diffusing a fresh and sweet scent," from Old French redolent "emitting an odor" and directly from Latin redolentem (nominative redolens), present participle of redolere "emit a scent, diffuse odor," from red-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see re-), + olere "give off a smell" (see odor). The meaning "odorous or smelling" of (or with) something is by 1700; figurative use of this is by 1828. Related: Redolently.

Related entries & more 
osmatic (adj.)

"having a good sense of smell, having well-developed olfactory organs," 1878, from French osmatique, apparently coined by Paul Broca, from Greek osmē "smell, scent, odor" from PIE root *hed- "to smell" (see odor). Related: Anosmatic.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
bloodhound (n.)
also blood-hound, type of large dog used in hunting, c. 1300, from blood (n.) + hound (n.). It traces wounded prey by the scent of the blood it has spilled, or any other trace. Similar formation in Dutch bloedhond, German Bluthund.
Related entries & more 
hid (adj.)

early 13c., past tense and alternative past participle of hide (v.1).

How to entangle, trammel up and snare
Your soul in mine, and labyrinth you there
Like the hid scent in an unbudded rose?
Aye, a sweet kiss — you see your mighty woes.
[Keats, from "Lamia," 1820]
Related entries & more 
wind (v.2)
"to perceive by scent, get wind of," c. 1400, from wind (n.1). Of horns, etc., "make sound by blowing through," from 1580s. Meaning "tire, put out of breath; render temporarily breathless" is from 1802, originally in pugilism, in reference to the effect of a punch in the stomach. Related: Winded; winding.
Related entries & more 
breathe (v.)

"to draw air into and expel it from the lungs; to inhale and exhale (a scent, etc.)," c. 1200, not in Old English, but it retains the original Old English vowel of its source word, breath. To breathe (one's) last "die" is from 1590s. To breathe down the back of (someone's) neck "be close behind" is by 1946. Related: Breathed; breathing.

Related entries & more 
perfume (n.)

1530s, "fumes from a burning substance," from French parfum (16c.), from parfumer "to scent," from Old Provençal perfumar or cognate words in dialectal Italian (perfumare) or Spanish (perfumar), from Latin per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + fumare "to smoke" (see fume (n.)). Meaning "substance containing agreeable essences of flowers, etc.," is attested from 1540s.

Related entries & more 

Page 2