Etymology
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see-saw (n.)

also seesaw, 1630s, in see-saw-sacke a downe (like a Sawyer), words in a rhythmic jingle used by children and repetitive-motion workers, probably imitative of the rhythmic back-and-forth motion of sawyers working a two-man pit saw (see saw (n.1). Ha ha.).

In reference to a children's sport of going alternately up and down on a plank balanced on some support, it is recorded from 1704; the figurative sense of this is from 1714. Applied from 1824 to the plank arranged and adjusted for the game. Also compare teeter-totter under teeter (v.). 

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sawn 
strong past participle of saw (v.), attested from c. 1400.
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sawer (n.)

"one who saws," agent noun from saw (v.). Also see sawyer.

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sawbones (n.)

"surgeon," 1837 (Dickens), slang, from verbal phrase; see saw (v.) + bone (n.).

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sawhorse (n.)
"support or rack for holding wood while it is cut by a saw," 1778, from saw (n.1) + horse (n.) in the mechanical sense.
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hacksaw (n.)
1867, from hack (v.1) + saw (n.1) "toothed cutting tool."
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sawbill (n.)

name given to several bird species with serrated bills, by 1763; see saw (n.1) + bill (n.2).

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sawfish (n.)

also saw-fish, "selachian fish having a long, flat snout with horizontal projecting teeth" (used in killing prey), 1660s; see saw (n.1.) + fish (n.).

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sawmill (n.)

"mill (originally driven by water or wind) for sawing timber into boards and planks," 1550s; see saw (n.1) + mill (n.1).

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sawtooth (n.)

c. 1600, "a tooth of a saw," from saw (n.1) + tooth. As an adjective, by 1876.

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