Etymology
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rustler (n.)

1820, "one who or that which rustles" (a leaf, a bird), agent noun from rustle (v.). The American English meaning "cattle thief" is by 1882; earlier it meant "active, efficient person" (1872).

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rush (n.1)

"plant growing in marshy ground," having leaves that grow as stiff pithy or hollow stalks, Middle English rishe, resh, rosh, rush, etc., from Old English resc (Kentish), risc, rysc, from Proto-Germanic *rusk- (source also of Middle Low German rusch, Middle High German rusch, German Rausch, West Frisian risk, Dutch rusch), perhaps from PIE *rezg- "to plait, weave, wind" (source also of Latin restis "cord, rope"). Old French rusche probably is from a Germanic source.

The remarkable variations in the vowel of this word make its precise history far from clear. [OED]

The stalks were cut and used for various purposes, including making torches and finger rings; they also were strewn on floors as covering or when visitors arrived; it was attested a type of something weak or of no value by early 14c.

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rush (n.2)

"a hasty driving forward, a tumultuous charge," late 14c., from rush (v.). Sense of "mass migration of people" (especially to a gold field) is from 1848, American English, in reference to California. The football/rugby sense is by 1857. The meaning "surge of pleasure" is from 1960s.

Rush hour is recorded by 1888. Rush order, one for goods required in a hurry, is from 1896. The sense in rush of business (1849), etc. is "extreme urgency of affairs."

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rust (n.)

"red oxide of iron, red coating which forms on the surface of iron exposed to the air," Old English rust "rust," in late Old English also figurative, "anything tending to spiritual corrosion, a moral canker," related to rudu "redness," from Proto-Germanic *rusta- (source also of Frisian rust, Old High German and German rost, Middle Dutch ro(e)st), from PIE *reudh-s-to- (source also of Lithuanian rustas "brownish," rūdėti "to rust;" Latin robigo, Old Church Slavonic ruzda "rust"), from suffixed form of root *reudh- "red, ruddy."

As a morbid condition of plants caused by fungal growth, from mid-14c. U.S. colloquial rust-bucket for "old car or boat" is by 1945. Rust Belt "decayed urban industrial areas of mid-central U.S." (1984) was popularized in, if not coined by, Walter Mondale's presidential campaign.

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russet (n.)

mid-13c., "coarse, woolen cloth," usually of a subdued reddish-brown color; also (early 15c.) the color of this; from Old French rousset, from rosset (adj.) "reddish," diminutive of ros, rous "red," from Latin russus, which is related to ruber "red" (from PIE root *reudh- "red, ruddy").

As an adjective, "reddish," from late 14c. The name continued even when the cloth color was brown or gray. The coarse, homespun cloth also was indicative of rustic homely, simple persons or qualities (by 1580s). The adjective was applied to a type of apples by 1620s; as the name of a variety of eating apple by 1708; as a type of pear by 1725.

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rusticity (n.)

1530s, "lack of breeding or refinement, awkwardness," from French rusticite (15c.), from Latin rusticitatem (nominative rusticitas) "country life," from rusticus (see rustic (adj.)). By 1630s as "rural life, quality, or character; anything betokening a rustic life or origin."

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rust (v.)

early 13c., rusten, of metals, "become rusty, gather rust," from rust (n.). The transitive sense of "cause to rust" is from 1590s. The figurative sense in reference to anything deteriorating or spoiling from disuse or idleness is by early 14c. Related: Rusted; rusting.

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rust-proof (adj.)

"protected or safe against production of rust," 1690s, from rust (n.) + proof (n.). As a verb, "to make rust-proof," by 1910 (implied in rust-proofing).

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Rushmore 

surname attested from c. 1200, Russemere, from place names.

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rush (v.)

mid-14c. (implied in rushing), "to drive back or down," from Anglo-French russher, from Old French ruser "to dodge, repel," which is from Latin recusare"make an objection against; decline, refuse, reject; be reluctant to" (see recuse; also compare ruse).

The meaning "do something quickly" is from 1650s, hence "to move or act with undue eagerness or without deliberation or preparation;" the transitive sense of "to hurry up (someone or something), cause to go swiftly" is from 1850. The sporting sense in U.S. football originally was in rugby (1857).

The fraternity/sorority sense is by 1896 (originally it was what the fraternity did to the student); from 1899 as a noun in this sense, "entertainment for prospective pledges." Earlier it was a name on U.S. campuses for tests of strength or athletic skill between freshmen and sophomores as classes (1860).

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