Etymology
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mojito (n.)

type of rum-based Cuban cocktail, by 1946, from Cuban Spanish, a diminutive of mojo, a word for certain sauces and marinades; Ayto ("Diner's Dictionary") considers it  to be "probably a reapplication of the Spanish adjective mojo 'wet,'" from mojar "to moisten, make wet," from Vulgar Latin *molliare"to soften by soaking," from Latin mollire "to soften" (see emollient). 

MOJITO
I don't know who originated this one, but every bar in the West Indies serves it, practically every rum recipe booklet gives the formula for it, so my little collection of rum drinks would hardly be complete without it. Such popularity must be deserved, and it is. It's a swell drink! ["Trader Vic's Book of Food and Drink," 1946]
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bayberry (n.)
"fruit of the bay tree," 1570s, from bay (n.4) + berry. In Jamaica, the name given to a type of myrtle (Pimenta acris), 1680s, from which bay-rum (1832) is made.
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daiquiri (n.)

alcoholic drink made with rum, lime juice, and sugar, 1920 (F. Scott Fitzgerald), from Daiquiri, name of a district or village in eastern Cuba. Said to have been invented by a U.S. mining engineer in Cuba in 1896.

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roomy (adj.)

"having ample room, spacious, capacious," 1620s, from room (n.) + -y (2). Related: Roominess. Also used in this sense was roomsome (1580s); the earlier adjective simply was room (Middle English roum, Old English rum) "wide, broad, large, spacious."

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swizzle (n.)
1813, name for various kinds of liquor drinks, or for intoxicating drinks generally, possibly a variant of switchel "a drink of molasses and water" (often mixed with rum), first attested 1790, of uncertain origin. As a verb from 1843. Related: Swizzled; swizzling. Swizzle-stick, used for stirring drinks, attested by 1859.
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room (n.)

Middle English roum, from Old English rum "space, extent; sufficient space, fit occasion (to do something)," from Proto-Germanic *ruman (source also of Old Norse, Old Saxon, Old High German, Gothic rum, German Raum "space," Dutch ruim "hold of a ship, nave"), nouns formed from Germanic adjective *ruma- "roomy, spacious," from PIE root *reue- (1) "to open; space" (source also of Avestan ravah- "space," Latin rus "open country," Old Irish roi, roe "plain field," Old Church Slavonic ravinu "level," Russian ravnina "a plain").

Old English also had a frequent adjective rum "roomy, wide, long, spacious," also an adverb, rumlice "bigly, corpulently" (Middle English roumli).

The meaning "chamber, cabin" is recorded by early 14c. as a nautical term; applied by mid-15c. to interior division of a building separated by walls or partitions; the Old English word for this was cofa, ancestor of cove. The sense of "persons assembled in a room" is by 1712.

Make room "open a passage, make way" is from mid-15c.  Room-service is attested from 1913; room-temperature, comfortable for the occupants of a room, is so called from 1879. Roomth "sufficient space" (1530s, with -th (2)) now is obsolete.

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Aramaic (adj.)
1824, in reference to the northern branch of the Semitic language group, from Greek Aramaia, the biblical land of 'Aram, roughly corresponding to modern Syria. The place name probably is related to Hebrew and Aramaic rum "to be high," thus originally "highland." As a noun, "the Aramaic langue," from 1833; Aramaic was the lingua franca of the Assyrian empire, the official language of the Persian kingdom, and the daily language of the Jews at the time of Christ.
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taffy (n.)
coarse candy made from sugar or molasses boiled down and cooled, 1817, related to toffee, but of uncertain origin; perhaps associated with tafia (1763), a rum-like alcoholic liquor distilled from molasses, presumably of West Indian or Malay (Austronesian) origin (perhaps a Creole shortening of ratafia). On this theory, the candy would have been made from the syrup skimmed off the liquor during distillation.
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pina colada (n.)

"long drink made with pineapple juice, rum, and coconut," 1923, from Spanish piña colada, literally "strained pineapple." The first word was originally "pine-cone" (and formerly pinna), from Latin pinea (see pineapple). Second word ultimately is from Latin colare "to strain" (see colander). Ayto ("Diner's Dictionary") writes that the drink probably originated in Puerto Rico and "enjoyed a certain vogue in the mid to late 1970s," as evidenced by a certain song.

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daredevil (n.)

1794, "recklessly daring person, one who fears nothing and will attempt anything," from dare (v.) + devil (n.). The devil might refer to the person, or the sense might be "one who dares the devil." For the formation, compare scarecrow, killjoy, dreadnought, pickpocket (n.), cut-throat, also fear-babe a 16c. word for "something that frightens children;" kill-devil "bad rum," sell-soul "one who sells his soul" (1670s).

As an adjective, "characteristic of a daredevil, reckless," by 1832. Related: Daredevilism; daredeviltry.

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