Etymology
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maltreatment (n.)

"rough, rude, or unkind treatment, abuse," 1721, from French maltraitement or formed in English from mal- + treatment.

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churlish (adj.)

late Old English cierlisc "of or pertaining to churls," from churl + -ish. Meaning "deliberately rude, surly and sullen" is late 14c. Related: Churlishly; churlishness.

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artless (adj.)
1580s, "unskillful," from art (n.) + -less. Later also "uncultured, rude" (1590s); then "unartificial, natural" (1670s) and "guileless, ingenuous" (1713). Related: Artlessly; artlessness.
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ungracious (adj.)
c. 1200, "ungrateful;" early 14c., "lacking God's grace;" early 15c., "rude, unmannerly," from un- (1) "not" + gracious (adj.). Related: Ungraciously.
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barbarian (adj.)
mid-14c., "foreign, of another nation or culture," from Medieval Latin barbarinus (see barbarian (n.)). Meaning "of or pertaining to savages, rude, uncivilized" is from 1590s.
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hirsute (adj.)
"hairy," 1620s, from Latin hirsutus "rough, shaggy, bristly," figuratively "rude, unpolished," related to hirtus "shaggy," and possibly to horrere "to bristle with fear" (see horror).
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randy (adj.)

1690s, "aggressive, boisterous," a Scottish word of uncertain origin, probably from rand "to rave," an obsolete variant of rant (v.). "In early use always of beggars, and probably implying vagrant habits as well as rude behavior. Now applied only to women" [OED]. The sense of "lewd, lustful, noisily wanton" is attested by 1847. Compare Scottish and northern English randy (n.) "a sturdy beggar or vagrant" (of males); "a noisy hoyden, a rude, romping girl." Related: Randiness.

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contumelious (adj.)

"rude and sarcastic, contemptuous, insolent," early 15c., from Old French contumelieus and directly from Latin contumeliosus "reproachful, insolently abusive," from contumelia "reproach, insult" (see contumely). Related: Contumeliously; contumeliousness.

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carter (n.)
"cart-driver," early 13c. (late 12c. as a surname), from Anglo-French careter, and in part an agent noun from cart (v.). Figurative of a rude, uncultured man from c. 1500.
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cotquean (n.)

1540s (now obsolete), originally apparently "housewife of a cot," from cot "hut, peasant's hut" (see cottage) + quean "woman." "Thence the transition is easy on the one side to 'one who has the manners of a labourer's wife, rude, ill-mannered woman, vulgar bedlam, scold ...' and on the other to 'a man who acts the housewife.' " These senses -- "rude, ill-mannered woman" and "man who busies himself with affairs which properly belong to women" -- both are attested from 1590s. Related: Cotqueanity.

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