Etymology
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roadhouse (n.)

"inn by a roadside," 1857, later "place for refreshment and entertainment along a road" (1922), from road (n.) + house (n.).

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roadwork (n.)

also road-work, 1765, "work done in making and repairing roads;" 1903 as "exercise done on roads;" from road (n.) + work (n.).

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roadway (n.)

"a highway; the part of a road used by horses and vehicles," c. 1600, from road (n.), perhaps preserving some of that word's old sense of "a riding," + way (n.).

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inroad (n.)

1540s, "hostile incursion, raid, foray," from in- (2) "in;" second element is road (n.) in the obsolete sense of "riding;" related to raid (v.). Related: Inroads.

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roadster (n.)

"open two-seat automobile," 1908, from road (n.) + -ster. Earlier it was used in reference to a type of light, horse-drawn carriage (1892); a horse for riding for pleasure (1818); and "a ship lying near the shore and working by tides" (1744).

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crossroad (n.)

also cross-road, 1680s, "road that crosses from one main road to another;" 1719 as "one of two or more roads that cross each other," from cross- + road. Meaning "place where two roads cross each other" is by 1808. Figurative sense "a turning point, a moment of decision" is from 1733.

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railroad (n.)

1757, from rail (n.1) + road. Originally "road laid with rails for heavy wagons" in mining operations. The process itself (but not the word) seems to have been in use by late 17c. Application to passenger and freight trains dates from 1825, tending to be replaced in this sense in England by railway.

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raid (n.)

early 15c., "mounted military expedition," Scottish and northern English form of rade "a riding, journey," from Old English rad "a riding, ride, expedition, journey; raid," (see road). The word fell into obscurity by 17c., but it was revived by Scott ("The Lay of the Last Minstrel," 1805; "Rob Roy," 1818), with a more extended sense of "attack, foray, hostile or predatory incursion." By 1873 of any sudden or vigorous descent (police raids, etc.). Of air raids by 1908.

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Tyburn 

place of public execution for Middlesex from c. 1200 to 1783; it stood at the junction of modern Oxford Street, Bayswater Road and Edgware Road.

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driveway (n.)

1870, "a way for driving," from drive (v.) + way (n.). Drive alone in this sense is attested from 1816. Specifically as "private road from a public road to a private house" by 1884. 

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