Etymology
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self-indulgence (n.)

"habit of undue gratification of one's own passions, desires, etc.," 1650s; see self- + indulgence.

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thew (n.)

Old English þeaw "usage, custom, habit;" see thews.

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inroad (n.)

1540s, "hostile incursion, raid, foray," from in- (2) "in;" second element is road (n.) in the obsolete sense of "riding;" related to raid (v.). Related: Inroads.

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roadway (n.)

"a highway; the part of a road used by horses and vehicles," c. 1600, from road (n.), perhaps preserving some of that word's old sense of "a riding," + way (n.).

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habitude (n.)

"customary manner, habit," c. 1400, from Old French habitude (14c.), from Latin habitudinem (nominative habitudo) "condition, appearance, habit," noun of state from past-participle stem of habere "have, hold; manage, keep" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive"). Related: Habitudinal (late 14c.).

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thews (n.)

Old English þeawes "customs, habit, manners; morals, conduct, disposition, personal qualities," plural of þeaw "habit, custom," from Proto-Germanic *thawaz (source also of Old Saxon thau "usage, custom, habit," Old High German thau "discipline"). According to OED, with no certain cognates outside West Germanic and of unknown origin. Meaning "bodily powers or parts indicating strength, good physique" is attested from 1560s, from notion of "good qualities." Acquired a sense of "muscular development" when it was revived by Scott (1818).

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sentimentalism (n.)

"tendency to be swayed by sentiment; sentimental habit of mind," 1801, from sentimental + -ism. Originally especially in reference to the philosophy of Rousseau.

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redingote (n.)

"double-breasted outer coat with long plain skirts," also a similar garment for women, 1793, from French redingote (1725), representing a French pronunciation of English riding coat (c. 1500).

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cropper (n.)

"a fall, as in horseback riding, in which the rider is thrown over the horse's head," hence "a failure," 1858, perhaps from crop (n.) in the "top of the head" sense.

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saddle (v.)

Old English sadolian "to put a riding saddle on;" see saddle (n.). The meaning "to load with or as with a burden" is recorded by 1690s. Related: Saddled; saddling.

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