Etymology
Advertisement
offbeat (adj.)

also off-beat, "unusual," 1938, from off (adv.) + beat (n.). From earlier sense in reference to the second and fourth beats in a four-beat music rhythm (1927), where the stress typically fell on the first and third. Compare upbeat.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
modus (n.)
"way in which anything is done," 1640s, from Latin modus (plural modi) "measure, extent, quantity; proper measure, rhythm, song; a way, manner, fashion, style," from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures." Especially in modus operandi and modus vivendi.
Related entries & more 
circadian (adj.)

coined 1959 by German-born biologist Franz Halberg, from Latin circa "about" (alternative form of circum "round about;" see circum-) + diem, accusative singular of dies "day" (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine"). The original use is in circadian rhythm.

Related entries & more 
rock (n.2)

1823, "action of rocking; a movement to and fro," from rock (v.1). As short for rock and roll, by 1957; but the sense of "musical rhythm characterized by a strong beat" is from 1946, in blues slang (Mezz Mezzrow, "Really the Blues"). Rock star is attested by 1966.

Related entries & more 
rheo- 

word-forming element meaning "current of a stream," but from late 19c. typically in reference to the flow or adjustment of electric current, from Greek rheos "a flowing, stream, current," which is related to rhein "to flow," rhythmos "rhythm" (from PIE root *sreu- "to flow").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
rock (v.2)

"to dance to popular music with a strong beat," 1948 (in song title "We're gonna rock"), from rock (v.1) in an earlier blues slang sense of "cause to move with musical rhythm" (1922); often used at first with sexual overtones, as in the 1922 song title "My Man Rocks Me (with One Steady Roll)". The sense developed in early 1950s to "play or dance to rock and roll music." Also see rock (n.2). Related: Rocked; rocking.

In reference to music, by 1938 as "to have a rocking rhythm;" by 1977 as "exhibit the characteristics of rock music." To rock out "enjoy oneself to rock music" is by 1968. Rocksteady, Jamaican pop music style (precursor of reggae), is attested from 1969.

Related entries & more 
measured (adj.)

late 14c., "moderate, temperate" (a sense now obsolete), past-participle adjective from measure (v.) in the sense of "exercise moderation." Meaning "uniform, regular, characterized by uniformity of movement or rhythm" is from c. 1400. That of "ascertained or determined by measuring" is from mid-15c. Meaning "deliberate, restrained" is from 1802.

Related entries & more 
metrical (adj.)

early 15c., "pertaining to versification, characterized by poetic measure or rhythm," from Latin metricus "metrical," from Greek metrikos "of or for meter, metrical," from metron "poetic meter" (from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure"). Old English had meterlic in this sense. Meaning "pertaining to measure or the use of weights and measures" is from 1640s. Related: Metrically.

Related entries & more 
ride (n.)

1759, "a journey on the back of a horse or in a vehicle," from ride (v.).

By 1815 as "a turn or spell of riding." By 1787 as "a saddle horse;" slang meaning "a motor vehicle" is recorded from 1930. The sense of "amusement park device" is from 1934.

The noun in the venery sense is from 1937. To take (someone) for a ride "tease, mislead, cheat," is first attested 1925, American English, possibly from underworld sense of "take on a car trip with intent to kill" (1927). Phrase go along for the ride in the figurative sense "join in passively" is from 1956.

A ride cymbal (1956) is used by jazz drummers for keeping up continuous rhythm, as opposed to a crash cymbal (ride as "rhythm" in jazz slang is recorded from 1936).

Related entries & more 
although (conj.)
early 14c., althagh, contraction of all though, preserving the once-common emphatic use of all. "All though was originally more emphatic than though, but by 1400 it was practically only a variant of it, and all having thus lost its independent force, the phrase was written as one word" [OED]. The choice between though and although is often determined by rhythm.
Related entries & more 

Page 2