Etymology
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clip-on (adj.)

"held on by means of a clip," 1909, from the verbal phrase; see clip (v.2) + on (adv.).

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hang on (v.)

1860, "to remain clinging," 1860, especially "cling fondly to" (1871); see hang (v.) + on (adv.). As a command to be patient, wait a minute, from 1936, originally in telephone conversations.

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hard-on (n.)

"penile erection," 1922, earlier as an adjective (1893), from hard + on.

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add-on (n.)

"additional component," 1941, from verbal phrase add on; see add (v.) + on (adv.).

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walk-on (n.)

"minor non-speaking role," 1902, theatrical slang, from the verbal phrase walk on, attested in theater jargon by 1897 with a sense "appear in crowd scenes," from walk (v.) + on (adv.). Meaning "actor who has such a part" is attested from 1946. The sports team sense is recorded from 1974.

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on-site (adj.)

also onsite, 1959, from on + site. Originally in reference to Cold War military inspections.

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put-on (n.)

"ruse, deception," 1937, from earlier adjectival meaning "assumed, feigned" (1620s), a figurative extension of the verbal phrase on the notion of putting on costumes or disguises. To put on (v.), of clothes, garments, etc., is by early 15c.; see from put (v.) + on (adv.). Hence "clothe, cover, assume as covering" (mid-15c.) and "assume the garb or appearance of" (real or feigned), 1520s. The expression put (someone) on "play a trick on, deceive" (by 1958) seems to be a back-formation from the noun.

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carry on (v.)

1640s, "continue to advance," also "manage, be engaged in," from carry (v.) + on (adv.). The meaning "conduct oneself in a wild and thoughtless manner" is by 1828. Carryings-on is from 1660s as "questionable doings," from 1866 as "riotous behavior." As an adjective, carry-on, in reference to luggage that may be brought into the passenger compartment of an airliner, is attested by 1965.

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iron-on (adj.)

1959, from the verbal phrase, from iron (v.) + on (adv.).

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