Etymology
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pineapple (n.)

late 14c., pin-appel, "pine cone," from pine (n.) + apple. The reference to the fruit of the tropical plant (from resemblance of shape) is recorded by 1660s, and pine-cone emerged 1690s to replace pineapple in its original sense except in dialect. For "pine-cone," Old English also used pinhnyte "pine nut." Pine-apple also was used in a late 14c. Biblical translation for "pomegranate."

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cancellation (n.)

also cancelation, "act of cancelling," 1530s, from Latin cancellationem (nominative cancellatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of cancellare "to cancel" (see cancel). Of reservations for conveyances, hotels, etc., from 1953. Earlier (early 15c.) in medical writing, in reference to the crossing of retinal images.

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ellipse (n.)

1753, from French ellipse (17c.), from Latin ellipsis "ellipse," also, "a falling short, deficit," from Greek elleipsis (see ellipsis). So called because the conic section of the cutting plane makes a smaller angle with the base than does the side of the cone, hence, a "falling short." The Greek word was first applied by Apollonius of Perga (3c. B.C.E.). to the curve which previously had been called the section of the acute-angled cone, but the word earlier had been technically applied to a rectangle one of whose sides coincides with a part of a given line (Euclid, VI. 27).

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pine-nut (n.)

"pine-cone," a sense now obsolete; also "edible seed-kernel of several species of pine," Old English pinhnyte; see pine (n.) + nut (n.).

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thyrsus (n.)

1590s, from Latinized form of Greek thyrsos, literally "stalk or stem of a plant," a non-Greek word of unknown origin. The staff or spear, tipped with an ornament like a pine cone and sometimes wreathed in ivy and vine branches, borne by Dionysus and his votaries.

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peen (n.)

also pein, 1680s, "edged, rounded, or cone-shaped end of a hammer head," opposite the face, which is ordinarily flat; probably from a Scandinavian source (compare Norwegian dialectal penn "peen," Old Swedish pæna "beat iron thin with a hammer"). Earlier as a verb, "to beat thin with a hammer" (1510s).

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stalagmite (n.)

cone-shaped formation of carbonate of lime on the floor of a cave, 1680s, from Modern Latin stalagmites (1650s, Olaus Wormius), from Greek stalagmos "a dropping," or stalagma "a drop, drip, that which drops," from stalassein "to trickle" (see stalactite). Related: Stalagmitic; stalagmitical.

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pinata (n.)

"decorated container (originally a pot) filled with sweets and small gifts, suspended from a ceiling and broken by a blindfolded person on festive occasions," 1887, from Mexican Spanish piñata, in Spanish "jug, pot," ultimately from Latin pinea "pine cone," from pinus (see pine (n.)).

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roundness (n.)

"state of being round or circular," late 14c., from round (adj.) + -ness.

Roundness applies with equal freedom to a circle, a sphere, a cylinder, or a cone, and, by extension, to forms that by approach suggest any one of these : as, roundness of limb or cheek. Rotundity now applies usually to spheres and to forms suggesting a sphere or a hemisphere : as, the rotundity of the earth or of a barrel ; rotundity of abdomen. [Century Dictionary]
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parabola (n.)

"a curve commonly defined as the intersection of a cone with a plane parallel with its side," 1570s, from Modern Latin parabola, from Greek parabole "a comparison, parable," literally "a throwing beside," hence "a juxtaposition" (see parable), so called by Apollonius of Perga c. 210 B.C.E. because it is produced by "application" of a given area to a given straight line. It had a different sense in Pythagorean geometry. Related: Parabolic.

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