Etymology
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leg-rest (n.)

1833, from leg (n.) + rest (n.1) "support on which something rests."

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arm-rest (n.)

also armrest, "something designed as a rest for the arm," by 1850, from arm (n.1) + rest (n.).

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areal (adj.)

"pertaining to an area," 1670s, from Latin arealis, from area "level ground, open space" (see area).

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acquiesce (v.)

1610s, "remain at rest" (a sense now obsolete); 1650s as "agree tacitly, concur," from French acquiescer "to yield or agree to; be at rest," (14c.), from Latin acquiescere/adquiescere "become quiet, remain at rest, rest, repose," thus "be satisfied with, be content," from ad "to" (see ad-) + quiescere "become quiet," from quies (genitive quietis) "rest, quiet" (from PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet"). Related: Acquiesced; acquiescing.

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quiet (n.)

c. 1300, "freedom from disturbance or conflict; calm, stillness," from Old French quiete "rest, repose, tranquility" and directly from Latin quies (genitive quietis) "a lying still, rest, repose, peace" (from PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet").

From late 14c. as "inactivity, rest, repose;" from c. 1400 as "absence of noise."

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restroom (n.)

also rest room, rest-room, 1887, "room set aside for rest and quiet" (in a workplace, public building, etc.); see rest (n.1) + room (n.). As these often later had (or were required to have) accessory toilet-rooms, by 1930s the word came to be a euphemism for "lavatory, toilet."

A. ... I walked into the rest room and three or four men went in there, talking, and it seemed to me as though the place was sort of disorganized.
Q. (By Mr. CARMODY.) What do you mean by "rest room"? Do you mean the toilet?
A. That is right.
Q. It really wasn't a rest room?
A. The rest room was upstairs, over the toilet.
[NLRB vs. Pennsylvania Greyhound Lines, Inc., transcript of record, U.S. Supreme Court, October Term, 1937]
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areola (n.)

"colored circle around a nipple" (areola papillaris), 1706, from Latin areola, literally "small area," diminutive of area (see area). Introduced in this sense 1605 by Swiss anatomist and botanist Caspar Bauhin. The word also is used in other anatomical senses. Related: Areolar.

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quiesce (v.)

"become quiet or calm, become silent," 1821, from Latin quiescere "to rest," from suffixed form of PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet."

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disquiet (v.)

"deprive of peace, rest, or tranquility," 1520s, from dis- + quiet (v.). Related: Disquieted; disquieting. As a noun, "want of quiet, rest, or peace," 1580s.

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repose (v.1)

"lie or be at rest," mid-15c., reposen, "rest (oneself)," from Old French reposer, earlier repauser (10c.), from Late Latin repausare "cause to rest," from re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see re-), + pausare "to stop" (see pause (v.)). Related: Reposed; reposing.

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