Etymology
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Andorra 

small republic in the Pyrenees between France and Spain, probably from indigenous (Navarrese) andurrial "shrub-covered land." Related: Andorran.

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Argentine (adj.)

"of or from Argentina," 1830 (from 1829 as a noun, "citizen or inhabitant of the Argentine Republic"); Argentinian is from 1845 as a noun, 1858 as an adjective.

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Bolivia 

South American republic, founded 1825, named for Simon Bolivar (1783-1830), statesman and soldier.

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Deutsch 

the German word for "German;" see Dutch. Deutschmark (abbreviation DM), the monetary unit of the old German Federal Republic, was introduced June 1948.

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Czechoslovakia (n.)

Central European nation from 1919-1992, from Czecho-, Latinized combining form of Czech + Slovakia (see Slovak). Related: Czechoslovak; Czechoslovakian. Since the breakup the western part has been known in English as the Czech Republic or Czechia.

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Nicaragua 

central American republic, named for the region, visited 1522 by Spanish conquistador Gil González Dávila, who is said to have named it for a local native chieftain, Nicarao, with Spanish agua "water." Related: Nicaraguan.

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Peru 

ancient realm in northwestern South America, later a Spanish viceroyalty, since 1821 an independent republic, from Spanish Peru, said to be from Quechua (Inca) pelu "river." Related: Peruvian.

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begonia (n.)

showy flowering plant native to warm regions, 1751, from French begonia (1706), named by French botanist Charles Plumier for Michel Bégon (1638-1710), French governor of Santo Domingo (Haiti) and patron of botany, + abstract noun ending -ia.

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Ostmark (n.)

name used in the West for the currency of the former German Democratic Republic (East Germany), 1948, from German Ost "east" (see east) + Mark, name of a unit of currency (see mark (n.2)).

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Prague 

capital of the Czech Republic, Czech Praha, perhaps from an ancient Slavic word related to Czech pražiti, a term for woodland cleared by burning. Popular etymology is from Czech prah "threshold." Related: Praguean; Praguian.

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