Etymology
Advertisement
dunno (v.)

a representation of a colloquial pronunciation of "(I) don't know," 1842, American English.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
mimesis (n.)

in rhetoric, "imitation or reproduction of the words of another," especially in order to represent his character, 1540s, from Greek mimēsis "imitation, representation, representation by art," from mimeisthai "to mimic, represent, imitate, portray," in art, "to express by means of imitation," from mimos "mime" (see mime (n.)). In zoology, "mimicry," by 1845.

Related entries & more 
literation (n.)
"representation of sounds by alphabetic letters," 1843, from Latin litera "alphabetic letter" (see letter (n.1)) + -ation.
Related entries & more 
emoticon (n.)

"pictorial representation of a facial expression using punctuation or other keyboard characters," by 1994, apparently from emotion + icon.

Related entries & more 
misstate (v.)

also mis-state, "state wrongly, make an erroneous representation of," 1640s, from mis- (1) + state (v.). Related: Misstated; misstating.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
br'er 
also brer, in Br'er Rabbit, etc., 1881, Joel Chandler Harris' representation of U.S. Southern black pronunciation of brother.
Related entries & more 
cannot (v.)
c. 1400, from can (v.1) + not. Old English expressed the notion by ne cunnan. The typical representation of the Scottish pronunciation is canna.
Related entries & more 
proportional (adj.)

late 14c. proporcional (implied in proporcionalli), "having a particular correspondence, according to or having a due proportion," from Old French proporcionel and directly from Late Latin proportionalis "pertaining to proportions," from proportio "comparative relation, analogy" (see proportion (n.)). The phrase proportional representation in the political sense for representation based on numerical proportion (rather than regional division) is attested by 1821. Related: Proportionally.

Related entries & more 
phonography (n.)

1701, "the science of sound-signs, representation of vocal sounds," from phono- "sound, voice" + -graphy "writing, recording." From 1840 as "representation of words as they are pronounced," specifically in reference to Pitman's system of shorthand by phonetic writing. By 1861 as "the automatic recording of sounds" by a phonautograph, later "recording or reproduction of sounds by a phonograph" (1880s).

Related entries & more 
love-scene (n.)

"a marked exhibition of mutual love; an interview between lovers; a pictured, written, or acted representation of such an interview" [Century Dictionary], by 1630s, from love (n.) + scene

Related entries & more 

Page 2