Etymology
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derogate (v.)

early 15c., transitive, "impair (authority); disparage (reputation)," a sense now obsolete, from Latin derogatus, past participle of derogare "to take away, detract from, diminish," also "repeal partly, restrict, modify," from de "away" (see de-) + rogare "ask, question; propose," apparently a figurative use of a PIE verb meaning literally "to stretch out (the hand)," from root *reg- "move in a straight line."

Intransitive sense of "take away a part, make an improper or injurious abatement" is from 1560s; that of "do something that tends to lessen one's honor or rank" is from 1610s.

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derogatory (adj.)

c. 1500, "detracting or tending to lessen authority, rights, or standing by taking something away from," from Late Latin derogatorius, from Latin derogatus, past participle of derogare "to take away, detract from, diminish," also "repeal partly, restrict, modify," from de "away" (see de-) + rogare "ask, question; propose," apparently a figurative use of a PIE verb meaning literally "to stretch out (the hand)," from root *reg- "move in a straight line." In reference to honor, esteem, or reputation, 1560s. Related: Derogatorily.

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