Etymology
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*pere- (1)

*perə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to produce, procure" and yielding and derived words in diverse senses; possibly related to *pere- (2) "to grant, allot."

It forms all or part of: ante-partum; apparatus; apparel; biparous; disparate; emperor; empire; heifer; imperative; imperator; imperial; juniper; multiparous; nulliparous; oviparous; para- (2) "defense, protection against; that which protects from;" Parabellum; parachute; parade; parados; parapet; parasol; pare; parent; -parous; parry; parturient; poor; post-partum; preparation; prepare; primipara; puerperal; rampart; repair (v.1) "to mend, put back in order;" repertory; separate; sever; several; spar (v.); viper; vituperation; viviparous.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit prthukah "child, calf, young of an animal;" Greek poris "calf, bull;" Latin parare "make ready, prepare," parire "produce, bring forth, give birth to;" Czech spratek "brat, urchin, premature calf;" Lithuanian periu, perėti "to brood;" Old High German farro, German Farre "bullock," Old English fearr "bull."

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overhaul (n.)

"an examination, inspection, repair," 1788, in nautical slang, from overhaul (v.).

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amendable (adj.)

1580s, "capable of correction or repair;" see amend + -able. Related: Amendability.

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analepsis (n.)

"recovery of strength after a disease," 1849, from Greek analepsis "a recovery," from analambanein "to restore, repair," literally "take up," from ana "up" (see ana-) + lambanein "to take" (see lemma).

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remediate (v.)

"remedy, redress, repair or remove something unwanted, restore to a natural or proper state," by 1961, a back-formation from remediation. Shakespeare seems to use it as an adjective in "Lear" (1605). The older verb is simply remedy. Related: Remediated; remediating.

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uphold (v.)

c. 1200, "support, sustain," from up (adv.) + hold (v.). Similar formation in Old Frisian upholda, Middle Dutch ophouden, German aufhalten. Meaning "maintain in good condition or repair" is from 1570s. Related: Upheld; upholding.

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restore (v.)

c. 1300, restoren, "to give back," also, "to build up again, repair; renew, re-establish; free from the effects of sin; bring back to a former and better state," from Old French restorer, from Latin restaurare "repair, rebuild, renew." This is from re- "back, again" (see re-) + -staurare, not attested by itself but also in instaurare "to set up, establish; renew, restore," etc.,  from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."

From late 14c. as "to cure, heal, bring back to a vigorous state;" of objects, beliefs, etc., "bring back to an original state or condition," 1670s. Related: Restored; restoring.

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analeptic (adj.)

1660s, in medicine, "restorative, invigorating, strengthening," from Latinized form of Greek analeptikos "restorative," from analambanein "to restore, repair," literally "take up," from ana "up" (see ana-) + lambanein "to take" (see lemma). Related: Analeptical (1610s).

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vamp (v.)

"extemporize on a piano," 1789, from vamp (n.1) "upper part of a shoe or boot," via verbal sense of "provide a stocking (later a shoe) with a new vamp" (1590s), then "patch up, repair" (compare revamp). Related: Vamped; vamping.

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amelioration (n.)

1650s, "a making or becoming better," from French amélioration, from Old French ameillorer (12c.), from a "to" (see ad-) + meillior (Modern French meìlleur) "to better, repair, improve," from Late Latin meliorare "improve," from Latin melior "better," perhaps originally "stronger" (from PIE root *mel- (2) "strong, great").

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