Etymology
Advertisement
anamnesis (n.)
"recollection, remembrance, reminiscence," 1650s, from Greek anamnesis "a calling to mind, remembrance," noun of action from stem of anamimneskein "remember, remind (someone) of (something), make mention of," from ana "back" (see ana-) + mimneskesthai "to recall, cause to remember," related to mnemnon "mindful," mneme "memory;" from PIE root *men- (1) "to think." In Platonic philosophy, "recollection of a prior life."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Clytaemnestra 
also Clytemnestra, wife and murderess of Agamemnon, from Greek Klytaimnestra, from klytos "celebrated, heard of" (see loud) + mnester "wooer, suitor," literally "willing to mind, mindful of," related to mnasthai "to remember," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think."
Related entries & more 
remind (v.)

1640s, "to remember, recall (something) to one's mind" (a sense now obsolete); 1650s as "put (someone) in mind of (something), bring to the remembrance of;" from re- "again" + mind (v.). A Latin-Germanic hybrid. Related: Reminded; reminding.

Related entries & more 
recorder (n.1)

early 15c., recordour, "chief legal officer of a city," whose duty is to register writings or transactions, from Anglo-French recordour (early 14c.), Old French recordeor "witness; storyteller; minstrel," from Medieval Latin recordator, from Latin recordari "remember" (see record (v.)). The meaning "registering apparatus" is from 1873.

Related entries & more 
in memoriam 

Latin, literally "in memory of," from accusative of memoria "memory" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember"). The phrase was much-used in Latin writing; Tennyson's poem of that name (published in 1850) seems to have introduced the phrase to English.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
memorable (adj.)

mid-15c., "worthy to be remembered, not to be forgotten," from Latin memorabilis "that may be told; worthy of being remembered, remarkable," from memorare "to bring to mind," from memor "mindful of" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember"). Related: Memorably; memorableness.

Related entries & more 
reminiscence (n.)

1580s, "act of recollecting," from Old French reminiscence (14c.) and directly from Late Latin reminiscentia "remembrance, recollection" (a loan-translation of Greek anamnesis), from Latin reminiscentem (nominative reminiscens), present participle of reminisci "remember, recall to mind," from re- "again" (see re-) + minisci "to remember," from root of mens "mind" (from PIE root *men- (1) "to think").

The meaning "a recollection of past incidents, events, conditions, etc. within one's personal knowledge" is attested from 1811; especially, in plural, "the collected memories and experiences (of someone) in literary form." The 17c. also had reminiscency "faculty of reminiscence."

Related entries & more 
memorious (adj.)

1590s, "having a good memory," from French memorieux or directly from Medieval Latin memoriosus, from Latin memoria (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember"). By 1856 (Sir Richard F. Burton, with whom it seems to have been a pet word) as "worthy to be remembered."

Related entries & more 
mind (v.)

mid-14c., "to remember, call to mind, take care to remember," also "to remind oneself," from mind (n.). The Old English verb was myngian, myndgian, from West Germanic *munigon "to remind." Meaning "perceive, notice" is from late 15c.; that of "to give heed to, pay attention to" is from 1550s; that of "be careful about" is from 1737. Sense of "object to, dislike" is from c. 1600. Meaning "to take care of, look after" is from 1690s. Related: Minded; minding.

Negative use "(not) to care for, to trouble oneself with" is attested from c. 1600; never mind "don't let it trouble you" is by 1778; the meiotic expression don't mind if I do is attested from 1847.

Related entries & more 
souvenir (n.)
1775, "a remembrance or memory," from French souvenir (12c.), from Old French noun use of souvenir (v.) "to remember, come to mind," from Latin subvenire "come to mind," from sub "up from below" (see sub-) + venire "to come," from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come." Meaning "token of remembrance, memento" is first recorded 1782.
Related entries & more 

Page 2