Etymology
Advertisement
alto-rilievo (n.)
also also-relievo, 1717, from Italian, literally "high-relief" in sculpture, from alto "high," from Latin altus (see alti-) + rilievo, from rilevare "to raise," from Latin relevare "to raise, lighten" (see relieve).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
relaxation (n.)

late 14c., relaxacioun, "a rupture, a hernia" (a sense now obsolete); mid-15c., "remission of a burden or penalty," from Old French relaxacion (14c.) and directly from Latin relaxationem (nominative relaxatio) "an easing, mitigation, relaxation," noun of action from past-participle stem of relaxare "loosen, open, stretch out" (see relax).

Meaning "relief from hard work or ordinary cares; a state or occupation intended to give mental or bodily relief after effort or ordinary occupations and cares" is from 1540s. Sense of "remission or abatement of rigor or intensity" is from 1690s.

Related entries & more 
merciful (adj.)

"exercising forbearance or pity; characterized by mercy, giving relief from danger, need, or suffering," mid-14c., from mercy + -ful. The earlier word was merciable (c. 1200). Related: Mercifully; mercifulness.

Related entries & more 
remediable (adj.)

c. 1400, "affording remedy or relief;" early 15c., of a disease, "able to be remedied, capable of being cured" (Chauliac), from Old French remédiable, from Latin remediabilis "that may be healed, curable," from stem of remediare "to heal, cure," from remedium "a cure, remedy" (see remedy (n.)).

Related entries & more 
stereoscope (n.)

1838, coined by inventor Professor Charles Wheatstone (1802-1875) from stereo- + -scope. Instrument allowing binocular vision of two identical pictures that appear as a single image with relief and solidity. Related: Stereoscopy; stereoscopically.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
repousse (adj.)

in reference to a type of decorative pattern, "formed in relief" by means of the hammer, "beaten from the under or reverse side," 1852, from French repoussé, past-participle adjective from repousser "to thrust back, beat back," from re- "back, again" (see re-) + pousser "to push" (see push (v.)). Related: Repoussoir.

Related entries & more 
comfort (n.)

c. 1200, "feeling of relief in affliction or sorrow; solace, consolation" (as still in take comfort); also "source of alleviation or relief;" from Old French confort "consolation, solace; pleasure, enjoyment," from conforter "to solace; to help, strengthen" (see comfort (v.)). An Old English word in the same sense was frofor. Meaning "state of enjoyment resulting from satisfaction of bodily wants and freedom from anxiety" is from mid-13c. Also in Middle English "strength, support, encouragement" (late 14c.). Comforts (as opposed to necessities and luxuries) is from 1650s. Comfort food "food that provides a nostalgic or sentimental value but typically is of dubious nutritional value" is by 1987.

Related entries & more 
intaglio (n.)
"incised engraving" (as opposed to carving in relief), 1640s, from Italian intaglio "engraved work" (plural intagli), from intagliare "to cut in, engrave," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + tagliare "to cut," from Late Latin taliare "to split" (see tailor (n.)).
Related entries & more 
subsidiary (adj.)
1540s, from Latin subsidiarius "belonging to a reserve, of a reserve, reserved; serving to assist or supplement," from subsidium "a help, aid, relief, troops in reserve" (see subsidy). As a noun, c. 1600, "subsidiary thing." In Latin the word was used as a noun meaning "the reserve."
Related entries & more 
type (n.)

late 15c., "symbol, emblem," from Latin typus "figure, image, form, kind," from Greek typos "a blow, dent, impression, mark, effect of a blow; figure in relief, image, statue; anything wrought of metal or stone; general form, character; outline, sketch," from root of typtein "to strike, beat," from PIE *tup-, variant of root *(s)teu- (1) "to push, stick, knock, beat" (see steep (adj.)).

Extended 1713 to printing blocks of metal or wood with letters or characters carved on their faces, usually in relief, adapted for use in letterpress printing. The meaning "general form or character of some kind, class" is attested in English by 1843, though the corresponding words had that sense in Latin and Greek. To be (someone's) type "be the sort of person that person is attracted to" is recorded from 1934.

Related entries & more 

Page 2