Etymology
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pycnometer (n.)

"instrument for determining the relative density of solid bodies," by 1858; see pycno- + -meter.

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relativity (n.)

1834, "fact or condition of being relative, existence as an immediate object of the understanding or experience, existence only in relation to a thinking mind," (apparently coined by Coleridge, in "Notes on Waterland's Vindication of Christ's Divinity"), from relative (adj.) + -ity. In scientific use, connected to the theory of Albert Einstein (1879-1955) having to do with the dependence of observation on the relative motion of observer and object, published in 1905 (special theory of relativity) and 1915 (general theory of relativity), but the word was used in roughly this sense by J.C. Maxwell in 1876. An earlier noun in the sense of "state of being relative" was relativeness (1670s).

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relativism (n.)

1865, in philosophy, "the doctrine that knowledge is only of relations," from relative (adj.) + -ism. Compare relativist.

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relatively (adv.)

"in relation to or by comparison to something else," early 15c., relativeli; see from relative (adj.) + -ly (2).

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penury (n.)

"extreme poverty, indigence, destitution," c. 1400, penurie, from Latin penuria "want, need; scarcity," related to pæne "nearly, almost, practically," which is of uncertain origin.

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poorly (adv.)

early 13c., poureliche, "inadequately, badly, insufficiently," from poor (adj.) + -ly (2). Modern form from 15c. Meaning "in poverty" is from mid-14c. Meaning "indisposed, in somewhat ill health" is from 1750.

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Siam 
name of Thailand before 1939 and from 1945-48, from Thai sayam, from Sanskrit syama "dark," in reference to the relative skin color of the people.
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parricide (n.)

1. "person who kills a parent or near relative" (1550s), also 2. "act of killing a parent or near relative" (1560s), both from French parricide (13c. in sense 1, 16c. in sense 2), from 1. Latin parricida, 2. Latin parricidium, probably from parus "relative" (a word of uncertain origin, but compare Greek paos, peos "relation," Sanskrit purushah "man") + 1. cida "killer," 2. cidium "killing," both from caedere "to kill, to cut down" (from PIE root *kae-id- "to strike"). Old English had fæderslaga. Related: Parricidal.

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relativist (n.)

1857, "one who holds the philosophical doctrine of relativism," from relative (adj.) + -ist. As an adjective from 1914, in reference to Einstein's theories. Related: Relativistic.

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Cyrene 

ancient Greek colony in Libya; the name is of unknown origin. Cyrenaic (1640s) typically refers to the philosophy ("practical hedonism") of Aristippus of Cyrene (c. 435-c. 356 B.C.E.); as a noun, "a Cyrenaic philosopher," from 1580s.

According to Aristippus, pleasure is the only rational aim, and the relative values of different pleasures are to be determined by their relative intensities and durations. He maintained also that cognition is limited to sensation. [Century Dictionary]
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