Etymology
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overstand (v.)

"to stand over or beside," from Old English oferstandan; see over- + stand (v.). In modern Jamaican patois it is used for understand as a better description of the relationship of the person to the information or idea.

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affinity (n.)

c. 1300, "relation by marriage" (as opposed to consanguinity), from Old French afinite "relationship, kinship; neighborhood, vicinity" (12c., Modern French affinité), from Latin affinitatem (nominative affinitas) "relationship by marriage; neighborhood," noun of state from affinis "adjoining, adjacent," also "kin by marriage," literally "bordering on," from ad "to" (see ad-) + finis "a border, a boundary" (see finish (v.)).

The spelling was re-Latinized in early Modern English. It has been used figuratively in English since c. 1600 of structural relationships in chemistry, philology, geometry, etc. The meaning "natural liking or attraction, a relationship as close as family between persons not related by blood" is from 1610s.

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removed (adj.)

"distant in relationship" (by some expressed degree, for example first cousin once removed), 1540s, from past participle of remove (v.). Meaning "remote, separated, secluded" from something is from 1610s.

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similitude (n.)
late 14c., from Old French similitude "similarity, relationship, comparison" (13c.) and directly from Latin similitudinem (nominative similitudo) "likeness, resemblance," from similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar).
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wattle (n.2)

"fleshy appendage below the neck of certain birds," 1510s (in jocular use extended to human beings, 1560s), of uncertain origin and of doubtful relationship to wattle (n.1). Related: Wattled.

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meadowlark (n.)

also meadow-lark, 1775 as a name for a type of of New World grassland songbird, from meadow + lark (n.), but it has no relationship to the Old World lark.

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co-dependent (adj.)

also codependent, by 1905, in various senses, from co- + dependent. Modern psychological sense "dysfunctionally supporting or enabling another in a relationship in addiction or other self-destructive behavior" is attested from c. 1983. Related: Co-dependence, co-dependency.

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brag (n.)
late 14c., "pomp; arrogance, pride;" see brag (v.); the exact relationship of the forms is uncertain. Meaning "that which is boasted" is from 1530s. As a once-popular poker-like card game, from 1734.
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sheave (n.)

"grooved wheel to receive a cord, wheel of a pulley," mid-14c., also "slice of bread" (late 14c.), related to or another form of shive (n.) "a slice, a piece," itself a word of uncertain origin and disputed relationship. The connecting notion in the two senses might be "length of wood."

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semantics (n.)

"the study of meaning in language; the science of the relationship between linguistic symbols and their meanings," 1893, from French sémantique (1883); see semantic (also see -ics). In this sense it replaced semasiology (1847), from German Semasiologie (1829), from Greek sēmasia "signification, meaning."

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