Etymology
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retell (v.)

"tell again, relate anew," 1590s, from re- "back, again" + tell (v.). Related: Retold; retelling, which is attested from 1640s as a verbal noun.

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horribile dictu 

Latin, "horrible to say, dreadful to relate," from neuter of horribilis (see horrible) + ablative supine of dicere "to say, speak" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly").

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telltale (n.)

also tell-tale, "discloser of secrets," 1540s, from tell (v.) + tale. As an adjective from 1590s. Phrase tell a tale "relate a false or exaggerated story" is from late 13c.

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report (v.)

late 14c., "to make known, tell, relate," from Old French reporter "to tell, relate; bring back, carry away, hand over," from Latin reportare "carry back, bear back, bring back," figuratively "report," in Medieval Latin "write (an account) for information or record," from re- "back" (see re-) + portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over"). Early 15c. as "to submit" (to an authority, etc.). Meaning "to name someone as having offended somehow" is from 1885.

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narrative (adj.)

mid-15c., narratif, "biographical, historical," from Late Latin narrativus "suited to narration," from Latin narrat-, stem of narrare "to tell, relate, recount, explain" (see narration). Meaning "of or pertaining to narration" is from c. 1600.

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narrator (n.)

1610s, "one who recounts or states facts, details, etc.," from Latin narrator "a relater, narrator, historian," agent noun from narrat-, stem of narrare "to tell, relate" (see narration). In sense of "a commentator in a radio program" it is from 1941.

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pertinent (adj.)

"belonging or relating to the subject or matter in hand," late 14c., from Anglo-French purtinaunt (late 13c.), Old French partenant (mid-13c.) and directly from Latin pertinentem (nominative pertinens) "pertaining," present participle of pertinere "to relate, concern" (see pertain). Related: Pertinently.

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announce (v.)

c. 1500, "proclaim, make known formally," from Old French anoncier "announce, proclaim" (12c., Modern French annoncer), from Latin annuntiare, adnuntiare "to announce, make known," literally "bring news to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + nuntiare "relate, report," from nuntius "messenger" (from PIE root *neu- "to shout"). Related: Announced; announcing.

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mirabile dictu (interj.)

Latin, literally "wonderful to relate," from neuter of mirabilis "wonderful, marvelous, extraordinary; strange, singular" (see marvel (n.)) + ablative supine of dicere "to say, speak" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly"). The expression is found in Virgil. Mirable "wonderful, marvelous" was used in English 15c.

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annunciate (v.)

"bring tidings of," 1530s, from Latin annunciatus, misspelling of annuntiatus, past participle of annuntiare "to announce, relate" (see announce). In some cases perhaps a back-formation from annunciation. Middle English had also a past-participle adjective annunciate "announced in advance, declared" (late 14c.). Related: Annunciated; annunciating.

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