Etymology
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ideality (n.)
1817, "quality of being ideal;" see ideal (adj.) + -ity. In phrenology, "imaginative faculty" (1828); as the opposite of reality, 1877.
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positive (n.)

1520s, originally in grammar, from positive (adj.). Sense of "that which can be affirmed, reality" is from 1610s. Sense in photography (opposite of negative (n.)) is by 1853.

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de facto 

Latin, literally "in fact, in reality," thus, "existing, but not necessarily legally ordained or morally right;" from facto, ablative of factum "deed, act" (see de +  fact).

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verisimilitude (n.)
"appearance of truth or reality, likelihood," c. 1600, from French verisimilitude (1540s), from Latin verisimilitudo "likeness to truth," from veri, genitive of verum, neuter of verus "true" (from PIE root *were-o- "true, trustworthy") + similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). Related: Verisimilar.
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-ality 

word-forming element; see -al (1) + -ity. Originally also in reduced form -alty, especially in words from French (mayoralty, etc.), hence the occasional doublet such as fealty/fidelity, realty/reality, specialty/speciality, loyalty/legality.

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specialty (n.)
c. 1300, "particular affection; special attachment or favor, partiality," from Old French especialte, more vernacular form of specialite (see speciality). Compare personalty/personality; realty/reality. From early 15c. as "unusual, or extraordinary thing; specialized branch of learning; peculiar quality, distinctive characteristic."
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mildly (adv.)

"in a mild manner or degree," Middle English mildeli, from Old English mildelice "graciously, affably, kindly;" see mild + -ly (2). Compare Dutch mildlijk, German mildlich, Danish mildelig. Phrase to put it mildly, implying a harsher reality than stated, is attested by 1849.

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insubstantial (adj.)
c. 1600, from Medieval Latin insubstantialis "not substantial," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Late Latin substantialis "having substance or reality, material," in Late Latin "pertaining to the substance or essence," from substantia "being, essence, material" (see substance). Related: Insubstantially.
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decided (adj.)

"resolute, free from hesitation or wavering," 1790, past-participle adjective from decide. A decided victory is one the reality of which is not in doubt; a decisive one goes far toward settling some issue. Meaning "free from ambiguity or uncertainty" also is from 1790. Related: Decidedly.

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Bodhisattva (n.)
"one of a class of beings in Mahayana Buddhism who have attained supreme wisdom," 1828, from Sanskrit, literally "one whose essence is perfect knowledge," from bodhi "perfect knowledge" (see Buddha) + sattva "reality, being," from sat-, sant- "existing, true, virtuous," from PIE root *es- "to be."
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