Etymology
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yare (adj.)
"ready, prepared," Old English gearo "ready, prepared, equipped," from gearwian "to equip, prepare" (related to gearwe "clothing, dress") from Proto-Germanic *garwjan "to make, prepare, equip, ready, complete" (see gear (n.)). Cognate with German gar, Dutch gaar. Related: Yarely.
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imprompt (adj.)
"not ready, unprepared," 1759, from Latin impromptus "unready, hesitating," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + promptus "ready" (see prompt (v.)).
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compliant (adj.)

"yielding to desire, ready to accommodate," 1640s, from comply + -ant.

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presto (adv.)

1590s, "quickly, immediately," a word used by conjurers, etc., from Italian presto "quick, quickly" in conjuror's patter, from Latin praestus "ready," praesto (adv.) "ready, available," from prae "before" (see pre-) + stare "to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Compare Latin praesto esse "to be at hand, be ready," source of French prêt "ready," and compare press (v.2). As a musical direction, "in rapid tempo," it is a separate borrowing from Italian, first recorded 1680s (Purcell).

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preparation (n.)

late 14c., preparacioun, "act of preparing or making ready, preliminary act or operation, a previous setting in order," from Old French preparacion (13c.) and directly from Latin praeparationem (nominative praeparatio) "a making ready," noun of action from past participle stem of praeparare "prepare," from prae "before" (see pre-) + parare "make ready" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure"). Meaning "a substance especially prepared or manufactured" is from 1640s.

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ripeness (n.)

Old English ripnes "state of being ready for harvest; state of full development;" see ripe (adj.) + -ness.

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gainly (adj.)
"well-formed and agile," 1886, probably a back-formation from ungainly. Earlier "ready, prompt" (1620s), from gain (n.).
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chop-house (n.)
1680s, "a mean house of entertainment, where provision ready dressed is sold" [Johnson], from chop (n.) in the "meat" sense + house (n.).
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prepare (v.)

mid-15c., "set in order or readiness for a particular end," a back formation from preparation and in part from Old French preparer (14c.), from Latin praeparare "to make ready beforehand," from prae "before" (see pre-) + parare "to make ready" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure"). Compare pare (v.), which is from the same Latin verb. Related: Prepared; preparer; preparing.

Intransitive sense of "make (oneself) ready beforehand" is from c. 1500. The sense of "bring into a particular mental state with reference to the future" is by 1520s. The sense of "make (food) ready to eat" is from late 15c. (Caxton). The meaning "provide or procure for future use" is from 1530s. An earlier verb was preparate (late 14c.), from Latin praeparatus, past participle of praeparare. The Boy Scouts' motto Be Prepared is attested from 1911, based, as he said, on the initials of the organization's founder, Robert Baden-Powell.

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conformable (adj.)

late 15c., "corresponding in form or character, resembling," 1510s; see conform + -able. Meaning "compliant, ready to follow directions" is from 1520s. Related: Conformably; conformability.

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