Etymology
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rat-a-tat (n.)

"a rattling sound or effect," 1680s, echoic, originally of a cooper hammering tubs.

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rat-catcher (n.)

"one whose business is the catching of rats, a ratter," 1590s, from rat (n.) + catcher.

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horse-race (n.)
also horserace, 1580s, from horse (n.) + race (n.1). Related: Horse-racing.
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race-track (n.)

"a race-course, the path over which a race is run," 1814, from race (n.1) + track (n.).

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rat fink (n.)
also ratfink, 1963, teen slang, see rat (n.) + fink (n.). Popularized by, and perhaps coined by, U.S. custom car builder Ed "Big Daddy" Roth (1932-2001), who made a hot-rod comic character of it, supposedly to lampoon Mickey Mouse.
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rat-tail (n.)

also rat's-tail, from rat (n.) + tail (n.1). Used since 16c. of conditions, growths, or devices held to resemble a rat's long, hairless tail in any way, including "lank lock of hair" (1810); "end of a rope" (1867). Related: Rat-tailed. A rat-tail file (1744) is a fine, round file used for enlarging holes in metal.

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rat-snake (n.)

"snake which kills rats," 1818, from rat (n.) + snake (n.).

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foot-race (n.)

"race run between persons on foot," 1660s, from foot (n.) + race (n.1).

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race-riot (n.)

"riot resulting from racial hostility," by 1875, American English, from race (n.2) + riot (n.). The thing itself is older; in the Jacksonian era it was comprised in the general term mobbing.

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race-course (n.)

1764, "plot of ground laid out for horse racing," usually elliptical and with accommodations for participants and spectators, from race (n.1) + course (n.). Meaning "canal along which water is conveyed to or from a water wheel" is by 1841.

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