Etymology
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shunt (n.)
1838, in railway use, from shunt (v.). By technicians in the sense of "electrical conductor" from 1863. Medical use dates from 1923.
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U-bahn (n.)
German or Austrian subway system, 1938 (originally in reference to Berlin), from German U-bahn, short for Untergrund-bahn, literally "underground railway."
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terminal (n.)
"end point of a railway line," 1888, from terminal (adj.); sense of "device for communicating with a computer" is first recorded 1954. Earlier "final part of a word" (1831).
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off-line (adj.)

1926, of railroads, "not done on a railway;" 1950, in computing, "not controlled by or connected to a computer or network;" from off (prep.) + line (n.).

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sidetrack (n.)
also side-track, "railway siding," 1835, from side (adj.) + track (n.). The verb meaning "to move (a train car) onto a sidetrack" is from 1874; figurative sense of "to divert from the main purpose" is attested from 1881. Related: Sidetracked.
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train-spotting (n.)
1959 (train spotter attested from 1958), chiefly British English, in reference to the hobby of recording the numbers of railway locomotives one has observed; from train (n.) in the railroad sense + verbal noun from spot (v.).
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cable-car (n.)
"car on a cable railroad," 1879, from cable (n.) + car. A streetcar moved by an endless cable which is cased in a small tunnel under the railway and kept in motion by a remote stationary engine.
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cross-tie (n.)

"transverse connecting piece of lumber," later especially "a railway tie, timber placed under opposite rails for support and to prevent spreading," from cross- + tie (n.).

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folder (n.)
1550s, "one who folds;" 1903, "folding cover for loose papers" (earlier as "a fold-up document," often a railway timetable or map); agent noun from fold (v.).
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smoker (n.)
1590s, "one who cures meat," agent noun from smoke (v.). Meaning "one who smokes tobacco" is from 1610s. Railway meaning "smoking car" is from 1875. Smoker's cough attested from 1898.
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