Etymology
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put-on (n.)

"ruse, deception," 1937, from earlier adjectival meaning "assumed, feigned" (1620s), a figurative extension of the verbal phrase on the notion of putting on costumes or disguises. To put on (v.), of clothes, garments, etc., is by early 15c.; see from put (v.) + on (adv.). Hence "clothe, cover, assume as covering" (mid-15c.) and "assume the garb or appearance of" (real or feigned), 1520s. The expression put (someone) on "play a trick on, deceive" (by 1958) seems to be a back-formation from the noun.

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fly-over (n.)

also flyover, 1901 of bridges, 1931, of aircraft flights, from fly (v.1) + over (adv.).

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sleep-over (n.)

1935, from verbal phrase; see sleep (v.) + over (adv.).

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go over (v.)

1580s, "review point by point;" see go (v.) + over (adv.). Meaning "be successful" is from 1923.

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all-over (adj.)

"covering every part," 1859, from the adverbial phrase; see all + over (adv.). As a noun, by 1838 as the trade name for a button, etc., gilded on both the upper and under sides, as distinguished from a top, plated on the upper side only. All-overish "generally and indefinitely indisposed" is from 1820, on the notion of "affecting the whole system." Related: All-overishness.

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over-age (adj.)

that is over a certain age," "1886, from over- + age (n.). Related: Over-aged (n.) "those who are too old" (late 15c.).

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one-liner (n.)

"short joke, witty remark," by 1951, from one + line.

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one-upsmanship (n.)

"act or practice of being 'one up,'" 1952, from noun phrase one up "scoring one more point than one's opponent" (1919) + ending from sportsmanship, etc.

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one-act (adj.)

of a play, "consisting of a single act," 1888, from one + act (n.).

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one-sided (adj.)

1833, "dealing with one side only of a question or dispute," hence, "partial, unjust, unfair," from one + side (n.). Translating German ein-seitiger. Related: One-sidedly; one-sidedness.

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