Etymology
Advertisement
love-child (n.)

"child born out of wedlock, child of illicit love," 1798, from love (n.) + child. Compare German Liebeskind. Earlier was love brat (17c.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
love-tap (n.)

"gentle blow given affectionately," 1848, from love (n.) + tap (n.2).

Related entries & more 
love-scene (n.)

"a marked exhibition of mutual love; an interview between lovers; a pictured, written, or acted representation of such an interview" [Century Dictionary], by 1630s, from love (n.) + scene

Related entries & more 
love-apple (n.)

old name for "tomato," 1570s, translating French pomme d'amour, corresponding to German Liebesapfel, etc., but the alleged aphrodisiac qualities that supposedly inspired the name seem far-fetched. The phrase also has been explained as a mangled transliteration of the Italian name pomo d'oro (by 1560s), taken as from adorare "to adore," but probably rather from d'or "of gold" (the earliest tomatoes brought to Italy in the mid-1500s apparently were of the yellow or orange variety), or, less likely, pomo de'Mori or Spanish pome dei Moro, literally "Moorish apple."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
love-longing (n.)

c. 1300, luue langing, from love (n.) + longing (n.).

Related entries & more 
self-love (n.)

"the instinct or virtue which directs a person's actions to the promotion of his own welfare," 1560s; see self- + love (n.). In early use especially "love of oneself, particularity to oneself."

Related entries & more 
puppyish (adj.)

"of the nature or character of a puppy," 1775, from puppy + -ish. Related: Puppyishness.

Related entries & more 
puppify (v.)

"make a puppy of, befool" [OED], 1640s, from puppy (n.) + -fy. Related: Puppified.

Related entries & more 

Page 2