Etymology
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belly-punch (n.)
also bellypunch, "fist-blow to the stomach," 1811, from belly (n.) + punch (n.3).
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Polichinelle (n.)
"Punch," French (17c.), from Neapolitan Polecenella (see Punch).
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fishbowl (n.)

also fish-bowl, "a glass globe in which fish are kept," 1850, from fish (n.) + bowl (n.). The form goldfish-bowl is attested from 1841. Figuratively, as a place where one is under constant observation, by 1957. Fish-globe is by 1858.

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cobbler (n.2)

"deep-dish fruit pie with thick, scone-like crust," 1859, American English, perhaps related to 14c. cobeler "wooden bowl or dish," which is of uncertain origin, or perhaps its shape simply reminded people of a cobblestone. Earlier cobbler was the name of a summer long drink made from wine or liqueur, crushed ice, and fruit slices (1809, in Washington Irving), which is sometimes said to be a shortening of cobbler's punch, but that term is not attested until 1847.

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hibachi (n.)
1863, from Japanese hibachi "firepot," from hi "fire" + bachi, hachi "bowl, pot," which Watkins derives ultimately from Sanskrit patram "cup, bowl," from PIE root *po(i)- "to drink."
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buffet (n.2)
c. 1200, "a blow struck with a fist or blunt weapon," from Old French bufet "a slap, a punch," diminutive of bufe "a blow, slap, punch; puff of wind," figuratively "cunning trick," probably echoic of the sound of something soft being hit.
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punchy (adj.1)
"nervously anxious; irritable from fatigue," 1937, from punch (v.) + -y (2). Perhaps originally a shortening of punch-drunk. Related: Punchily; punchiness.
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suckerpunch (n.)
also sucker-punch, 1926, from sucker in the "dupe" sense + punch (n.3). Figurative use by 1929. As a verb by 1942. Related: Sucker-punched.
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punchless (adj.)

1950 of fighters and others deficient in requisite power, from punch (n.1); 1853 of situations in which one might seek a drink in vain, from punch (n.2). Related: Punchlessly; punchlessness.

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Punchinello (n.)

popular puppet of Italian origin; see Punch.

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