Etymology
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pull-back (n.)

also pullback, 1660s, "act or action of pulling back," from the verbal phrase; see pull (v.) + back (adv.). From 1951 in the military sense of "orderly withdrawal of troops."

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tease (v.)

formerly also teaze, Old English tæsan "pluck, pull, tear; pull apart, comb" (fibers of wool, flax, etc.), from Proto-Germanic *taisijan (source also of Danish tæse, Middle Dutch tesen, Dutch tezen "to draw, pull, scratch," Old High German zeisan "to tease, pick wool").

The original sense is of running thorns through wool or flax to separate, shred, or card the fibers. The figurative sense of "vex, worry, annoy" (sometimes done in good humor) emerged 1610s. For similar sense development, compare heckle. Hairdressing sense is recorded from 1957. Related: Teased; teasing; teasingly.

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pullout (n.)

also pull-out, 1820, "a withdrawal," from the verbal phrase; see pull (v.) + out (adv.). The phrase pull out "extract, remove" is attested from late 14c. As "detachable section or page of a newspaper, magazine, etc." by 1952, short for pull-out section (by 1949). As an adjective by 1875.

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convulsive (adj.)

1610s, "of the nature of or characterized by convulsion," from French convulsif, from Medieval Latin *convulsivus, from convuls-, past-participle stem of convellere "to pull away, to pull this way and that, wrench," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + vellere "to pluck, pull violently" (see svelte). Meaning "producing or attended by convulsions" is from 1700. Related: Convulsively.

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yank (v.)

"to pull, jerk," 1822, Scottish, of unknown origin. Related: Yanked; yanking. The noun is 1818 in sense of "sudden blow, cuff;" 1856 (American English) as "a sudden pull."

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tow (v.)

"pull with a rope," Old English togian "to drag, pull," from Proto-Germanic *tugojanan (source also of Old English teon "to draw," Old Frisian togia "to pull about," Old Norse toga, Old High German zogon, German ziehen "to draw, pull, drag"), from PIE root *deuk- "to lead" (source also of Latin ducere "to lead"). Related: Towed; towing.

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convulse (v.)

1640s, "to shake or disturb by violent, irregular action" (transitive); 1680s, "to draw or contract spasmodically or involuntarily" (intransitive); from Latin convulsus, past participle of convellere (transitive only) "to pull away, to pull this way and that, wrench," hence "to weaken, overthrow, destroy," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + vellere "to pluck, pull violently" (see svelte). Related: Convulsed (1630s); convulsing.

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tug (v.)

c. 1200, from weak grade of Old English teohan "to pull, drag," from Proto-Germanic *teuhan "to pull" (source also of Old High German zucchen "to pull, jerk," German zücken "to draw quickly), from PIE root *deuk- "to lead." Related to tow (v.). Related: Tugged; tugging.

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haul (v.)

"pull or draw forcibly," 1580s, hall, variant of Middle English halen "to drag, pull" (see hale (v.)). Spelling with -au- or -aw- is from early 17c. Related: Hauled; hauling. To haul off "pull back a little" before striking or otherwise acting is American English, 1802.

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lug (v.)

late 14c., "pull (something) slowly or with effort," from Scandinavian (compare Swedish lugga, Norwegian lugge "to pull by the hair"); see lug (n.). Related: Lugged; lugging.

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