Etymology
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introject (v.)
1902 in psychology, probably a back-formation from introjection. Related: Introjected; introjecting.
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operationalize (v.)

1954, in psychology, "express in operational terms," from operational + -ize. Related: Operationalized; operationalizing; operationalization (1966).

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psycho (n.)

1925 as short for psychologist; (earlier short for psychology, 1921); as short for psychopath by 1942.

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perseverate (v.)

"repeat a response after the cessation of the original stimulus," by 1909, in psychology, a back-formation from perseveration. Related: Perseverating; perseverative.

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love-hate (adj.)
expressing ambivalent and strong feelings toward someone or something, 1935, originally in the jargon of psychology, from love + hate.
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surgent (adj.)
"rising in waves," 1590s, from Latin surgentem (nominative surgens) "rising," present participle of surgere "to rise" (see surge (n.)). In psychology from 1933.
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thanatos (n.)
"death instinct," 1935, in Freudian psychology, from Greek thanatos "death" (see thanato-).
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hedonistic (adj.)
1849, from hedonist + -ic. The earlier adjectival form was hedonic. By 1901 in psychology, "of the nature of pleasure-seeking."
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depressive (adj.)

"able or tending to depress," 1610s, from Latin depress-, past-participle stem of deprimere (see depress) + -ive. In psychology, from 1905. Related: Depressiveness.

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self-image (n.)

1904 in psychology, "a conception of oneself" in relation to others; see self- + image (n.).

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