Etymology
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knuckle-duster (n.)
face-busting, hand-protecting metal knuckle-guard, 1857, from knuckle (n.) + duster, name of a type of protective coat worn by workmen.
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sari (n.)

also saree, the long, wrapping garment of silk or cotton worn by Hindu women, 1785, from Hindi sari, from Prakrit sadi, from Sanskrit sati "garment, petticoat."

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pilch (n.)

Middle English pilche "garment made from the skin or fur of animals," usually an outer garment, from Old English pilece, from Medieval Latin pellicea "a furred garment," fem. of Latin pelliceus "of fur or skin," from pellis "skin, pelt" (from PIE root *pel- (3) "skin, hide"). Later, "triangular wrapper for an infant, worn over the diaper" (1670s).

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hair-shirt (n.)
garment of ascetics and penitents, 1680s, from hair + shirt. Figurative use by 1884. Earlier, such a garment was called simply a hair (c. 1200); and compare haircloth.
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sarong (n.)

skirt-like garment worn over the lower body by both sexes, the Malay national garment, 1834, from Malay (Austronesian) sarung "sheath, covering." OED traces it to "some mod. form of Skr. saranga 'variegated.' "

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fitting (n.)
c. 1600, verbal noun from fit (v.). Meaning "action of fitting on a garment" is from 1900.
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parka (n.)

1780, "hooded outer garment made of skins, worn by Eskimos," from Aleut parka, from Russian parka "a pelt or jacket made from pelt," which is said to be from Samoyed, a Uralic language spoken in Siberia. As the trade name of a similar wind-proof manufactured garment (also known as an anorak), by 1958.

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dhoti 

garment worn by men in India, 1620s, from Hindi dhoti.

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weeds (n.)
"garments" (now surviving, if at all, in widow's weeds), plural of archaic weed, from Old English wæd, wæde "robe, dress, apparel, garment, clothing," from Proto-Germanic *wedo (source also of Old Saxon wadi, Old Frisian wede "garment," Old Norse vað "cloth, texture," Old High German wat "garment"), probably from PIE *wedh-, extended form of root *au- (3) "to weave." Archaic since early 19c.
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