Etymology
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camera obscura (n.)
1725, "a darkened room;" c. 1730, "a device for project pictures;" see camera.
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out-thrust (adj.)

"to extend or project outward," 1820, from out- + thrust (v.). Related: Out-thrusting.

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bow-window (n.)
"window built so as to project from a wall, curved segmentally," 1753, from bow (n.1) + window.
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pre-eminence (n.)

also pre-eminence, c. 1200, "surpassing eminence; superiority, distinction; precedence, a place of rank or distinction," from Late Latin praeeminentia "distinction, superiority," from Latin praeeminentem (nominative praeeminens), present participle of praeeminere "transcend, excel," literally "project forward, rise above," from prae "before" (see pre-) + eminere "stand out, project" (see eminent).

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amenable (adj.)

1590s, "liable to make answer or defense, accountable," from Anglo-French amenable, from Old French amener "bring, take, conduct, lead" (to the law), from "to" (see ad-) + mener "to lead," from Latin minare "to drive (cattle) with shouts," variant of minari "to threaten," also "to jut, project" (from PIE root *men- (2) "to project"). Sense of "tractable" is from 1803, from notion of "disposed to answer or submit to influence." Related: Amenably.

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menace (n.)

c. 1300, "declaration of hostile intent," also (early 14c.) "a threat or act of threatening," from Old French menace "menace, threat" (9c.), from Vulgar Latin minacia "threat, menace" (also source of Spanish amenaza, Italian minaccia), singular of Latin minaciæ "threatening things," from minax (genitive minacis) "threatening," from minari "threaten; jut, project," from minæ "threats; projecting points," from PIE root *men- (2) "to project." Applied to persons from 1936.

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prominence (n.)

1590s, "projection, a standing or jutting out from the surface of something," from obsolete French prominence (16c.), from Latin prominentia "a projection, a jutting out," abstract noun from prominere "jut or stand out, be prominent, overhang," from pro "before, forward" (see pro-) + -minere "project, jut out," which is related to mons "hill" (from PIE root *men- (2) "to project").  Meaning "distinction, conspicuousness" is attested by 1827. As a type of solar phenomenon, from 1862.

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eminent (adj.)

early 15c., "standing or rising above other places; exceeding other things in quality or degree;" from Old French éminent "prominent" (13c.) or directly from Latin eminentem (nominative eminens) "standing out, projecting, prominent, high," figuratively "distinguished, distinctive," present participle of eminere "stand out, project; be prominent, be conspicuous," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + -minere, which is related to mons "hill" (from PIE root *men- (2) "to project"). From 1610s, of persons, "distinguished in character or attainments." Related: Eminently.

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cismontane (adj.)

"situated on (the speaker's) side of the mountain or mountains," 1826, from Latin cis- "on this side of" (see cis-) + stem of mons "mountain" (from PIE root *men- (2) "to project"). Specifically "on the north side of the Alps" (compare ultramontane).

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prominent (adj.)

mid-15c., "projecting, jutting out, standing out beyond the line or surface of something," from Latin prominentem (nominative prominens) "prominent," present participle of prominere "jut or stand out, be prominent, overhang," from pro "before, forward" (see pro-) + -minere "project, jut out," which is related to mons "hill" (from PIE root *men- (2) "to project").

Of features, "conspicuous, standing out so as to strike the mind or eye," from 1759; of persons, "notable, leading, eminent, standing out from among the multitude," from 1849. Related: Prominently.

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